conglobate

Definition from Wiktionary, the free dictionary
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English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

from Latin conglobare, from com- (together) + globus (ball)

Adjective[edit]

conglobate (comparative more conglobate, superlative most conglobate)

  1. Shaped like or formed into a ball.
    • 1705, George Cheyne, “Of the Existence of a Deity”, in Philosophical Principles of Natural Religion: [], London: Printed for George Strahan [], OCLC 12981367, § XXXV, page 213:
      By the motion of the Heart, through the Emulgent Branches, the Blood is brought to the Kidneys, and is there freed of its Serum by their little Glands, [] Much after the ſame manner, are their proper Fluids ſeparated from the Blood in the Liver, Sweetbread, Teſticles, and the other Conglobat and Conglomerate Glands of the Body [].

Translations[edit]

Verb[edit]

conglobate (third-person singular simple present conglobates, present participle conglobating, simple past and past participle conglobated)

  1. (transitive) To form into a globe or ball.
    • 1850, Thomas Cooper, The Purgatory of Suicides: A Prison-Rhyme, second edition:
      How rich a dower was yours!
      By how much toil of sinew and of mind
      Collected, conglobated, were Earth’s stores
      Treasured in Rome,—the Eternal!—throne assigned
      By Nature and the Gods for sway of human kind!

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Related terms[edit]

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Italian[edit]

Verb[edit]

conglobate

  1. second-person plural present indicative of conglobare
  2. second-person plural imperative of conglobare
  3. feminine plural of conglobato

Latin[edit]

Verb[edit]

conglobāte

  1. second-person plural present active imperative of conglobō