cope

Definition from Wiktionary, the free dictionary
Jump to navigation Jump to search
See also: copé, copë, and Cope

English[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /kəʊp/
  • Rhymes: -əʊp
  • (file)

Etymology 1[edit]

From Middle English coupen, from Old French couper (to strike, to cut).

Verb[edit]

cope (third-person singular simple present copes, present participle coping, simple past and past participle coped)

  1. (intransitive) To deal effectively with something, especially if difficult.
    I thought I would never be able to cope with life after the amputation, but I have learned how to be happy again.
    • 2012 May 5, Phil McNulty, “Chelsea 2-1 Liverpool”, in BBC Sport[1]:
      Chelsea were coping comfortably as Liverpool left Luis Suarez too isolated. Steven Gerrard was also being forced to drop too deep to offer support to the beleaguered Jay Spearing and Jordan Henderson rather than add attacking potency alongside the Uruguayan.
  2. To cut and form a mitred joint in wood or metal.
  3. (falconry) To clip the beak or talons of a bird.
Synonyms[edit]
Antonyms[edit]
Translations[edit]

Interjection[edit]

cope

  1. (rude) Expression of spite towards someone who suffered a major setback.
    "The other guy cheated, I had no chance!" "Cope."

Etymology 2[edit]

From Middle English cope, from Medieval Latin cāpa (cape) Doublet of cap, cape, and chape.

Noun[edit]

cope (plural copes)

Cope worn by a bishop
  1. A long, loose cloak worn by a priest, deacon, or bishop when presiding over a ceremony other than the Mass.
    • 1679-1715, Gilbert Burnet, History of the Reformation
      a hundred and sixty priests all in their copes
    • 1890, Oscar Wilde, The Picture of Dorian Gray, ch. XI:
      He possessed a gorgeous cope of crimson silk and gold-thread damask, figured with a repeating pattern of golden pomegranates set in six-petalled formal blossoms, beyond which on either side was the pine-apple device wrought in seed-pearls.
  2. Any covering such as a canopy or a mantle.
  3. (literary) The vault or canopy of the skies, heavens etc.
  4. (construction) A covering piece on top of a wall exposed to the weather, usually made of metal, masonry, or stone, and sloped to carry off water.
  5. (foundry) The top part of a sand casting mold[1].
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Knight to this entry?)
  6. An ancient tribute due to the lord of the soil, out of the lead mines in Derbyshire, England.
Translations[edit]

Verb[edit]

cope (third-person singular simple present copes, present participle coping, simple past and past participle coped)

  1. (transitive) To cover (a joint or structure) with coping.
  2. (intransitive) To form a cope or arch; to bend or arch; to bow.
    • 1603, Philemon Holland (translator), The Philosophie, commonly called, the Morals (originally by Plutarch)
      [wrestlers] tripping, [] coping and tugging
Translations[edit]

Etymology 3[edit]

From Middle English copen, borrowed from Middle Dutch copen. Cognate with Dutch kopen, German kaufen.

Verb[edit]

cope (third-person singular simple present copes, present participle coping, simple past and past participle coped)

  1. (obsolete) To bargain for; to buy.
  2. (obsolete) To exchange or barter.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Edmund Spenser to this entry?)
  3. (obsolete) To make return for; to requite; to repay.
  4. (obsolete) To match oneself against; to meet; to encounter.
  5. (obsolete) To encounter; to meet; to have to do with.

References[edit]

  1. ^ 1880, Leo de Colange, The American Dictionary of Commerce []

cope in Webster’s Revised Unabridged Dictionary, G. & C. Merriam, 1913.

Anagrams[edit]


Friulian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Late Latin cuppa, from Latin cūpa.

Noun[edit]

cope f (plural copes)

  1. goblet
  2. bowl
  3. cup

Middle English[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin cāpa; possibly through a Old English *cāpa.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

cope (plural copes)

  1. A cape or cloak; a loose-fitting outer layer.
  2. A cope; a cape used by clerics and priests, especially that worn by mendicants or monastics.
  3. Any sort of covering or cover, especially the heavens.

Descendants[edit]

  • English: cope
  • Scots: caip, cape, cap

References[edit]


Old French[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Late Latin cuppa, from Latin cūpa.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

cope f (oblique plural copes, nominative singular cope, nominative plural copes)

  1. cup (vessel from which liquid is drunk)

Descendants[edit]


Spanish[edit]

Verb[edit]

cope

  1. Formal second-person singular (usted) imperative form of copar.
  2. First-person singular (yo) present subjunctive form of copar.
  3. Formal second-person singular (usted) present subjunctive form of copar.
  4. Third-person singular (él, ella, also used with usted?) present subjunctive form of copar.