corona

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See also: Corona, coroná, and coronà

English[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

The Barbarossa Chandelier in Aachen Cathedral, Aachen, Germany, an example of a corona (sense 1).
The Sun’s corona (sense 4.1) and prominences during a total solar eclipse.
Artemis, the largest corona (sense 4.2) identified on the surface of Venus.
Narcissus flowers with an outer white corolla and a central yellow corona (sense 6.1).
An illustration of the morphology of a coronavirus, with its corona (sense 6.3) formed by surface projections (red).
A lunar corona (sense 8) as seen from Minnesota, United States.

Etymology 1[edit]

The noun is borrowed from Latin corōna (crown; garland, wreath),[1] from Ancient Greek κορώνη (korṓnē, type of crown; curved object (door handle, tip of a bow, stern of a ship, etc.)), from Proto-Indo-European *(s)ker- (to turn, bend). The English word is a doublet of crown.

The plural form coronae is borrowed from Latin corōnae.

The verb is derived from the noun.

Noun[edit]

corona (plural coronas or coronae or (obsolete) coronæ)

  1. A large, round, pendent chandelier, with spikes around its upper rim to hold candles or lamps, usually hung from the roof of a church.
    Synonym: corona lucis
  2. (anatomy) An upper or crownlike portion of certain parts of the body.
    1. A region of the skull located along the coronal suture, at the junction between the frontal bone and the two parietal bones.
      • 1863 September, John Thurnam, “XXII.—On Synostosis of the Cranial Bones, Especially the Parietals, Regarded as a Race-character in One Class of Ancient British and in African Skulls”, in G[eorge] Busk [et al.], editors, The Natural History Review: A Quarterly Journal of Biological Science, number XVIII, London; Edinburgh: Williams and Norgate, [], published April 1865, OCLC 490122528, page 265:
        Is it probable that this depression has arisen from the distorting effect of some form of head dress, similar perhaps to that which is still applied to the heads of infants in various parts of France, as described by Drs. Foville and Lunier? This consists of a neckerchief passed twice round the head from the corona either to the back of the neck, when the resulting deformity (which is that of the Charlcombe skull) is designated annular by Dr. Gosse; or is carried under the chin and jaw, when it is termed bilobed by the same writer.
      • 2013, Eric S. Hsu; Charles Argoff; Katherine E. Galluzzi; Raphael J. Leo; Andrew Dubin, “Head Pain: Trigeminal Neuralgia”, in Problem-Based Pain Management, Cambridge, Cambridgeshire: Cambridge University Press, →ISBN, section 2 (Head Pain), page 27:
        The ophthalmic division supplies sensation from the eyebrows to the coronal suture. The sensory innervation stops at the corona, not at the hairline, and this fact may help one to differentiate a true abnormality from a factitious one, since people who are “faking” sensory loss more often lose sensation at the hairline.
    2. The external portion of the tooth, covered by enamel; the crown.
      • 1817, J. Fred. Blumenbach [i.e., Johann Friedrich Blumenbach], “Sect. III. Of the Solids in General, and of the Mucous Web in Particular.”, in John Elliotson, transl., The Institutions of Physiology [], 2nd edition, London: [] Bensley and Son, [], for E. Cox and Son, [], OCLC 776474968, paragraph 17, page 12:
        The solids are derived from the fluids. In the first rudiments of the gelatinous embryo, they gradually commence in their respective situations, and differ infinitely in their degrees of cohesion, from the soft and almost pulpy medullary matter of the brain, to the vitreous substance of the corona of the teeth.
    3. The circumference of the base of the glans penis in human males.
      • 1907, C. H. Shutt, “A New Simple Technique for Circumcision and Some Advantages Gained in Genito-urinary Work—a Practical Demonstration of the Technique”, in Tho[ma]s A. Hopkins, editor, The Medical Fortnightly, St. Louis, Mo.: Fortnightly Press Co., OCLC 427191769, page 233, column 1:
        The first line of injection with a clean 1% solution of cocain, or 2% eucain is began, posterior to the ridge caused by the corona, on the dorsum.
  3. (architecture) The large, flat, projecting member of a cornice which crowns the entablature, situated above the bed moulding and below the cymatium.
    Synonyms: drip, larmier
    • 2018, John Milnes Baker, “Georgian 1715–1780”, in American House Styles: A Concise Guide, The Countryman Press, W[illiam] W[arder] Norton & Company, →ISBN, page 39:
      Though somewhat verbose, the author is specific in his instruction that the S-shaped crown molding, the cymarecta, caps the top of the pediment and is not returned on the horizontal corona.
  4. (astronomy)
    1. The luminous plasma atmosphere of the Sun (the solar corona) or other star, extending millions of kilometres into space, most easily seen during a total solar eclipse.
    2. (also geology) An oval-shaped astrogeological feature, present on both the planet Venus and Uranus's moon Miranda, probably formed by upwellings of warm material below the surface.
      • 2007, Gunter Faure; Teresa M. Mensing, “Uranus: What Happened Here?”, in Introduction to Planetary Science: The Geological Perspective, Dordrecht: Springer, →ISBN, page 379, column 1:
        The area density of impact craters on the surfaces of the coronas suggests that the episode of tidal heating occurred approximately one billion years ago [].
  5. (by extension) Any luminous or crownlike ring around an object or person.
    • 1980, Philip Caputo, Horn of Africa, 1st Vintage Contemporaries edition, New York, N.Y.: Vintage Books, published February 2002, →ISBN, page 446:
      It looked like a miniaturized version of Hiroshima. Fires burned here and there. [] His once and future presidential palace was a crater ringed by a corona of flaming debris.
    • 2005 summer, Lauren Wilcox, “Dale Hawkins: That’s Guitar Playing”, in Oxford American: A Magazine of the South (Southern Music Issue; 7)‎[1], number 50, Oxford, Miss.: Oxford American, ISSN 1074-4525, OCLC 833804612, archived from the original on 27 October 2020, pages 16–20:
      [Dale] Hawkins is a tall man, angular and knobby, with a rubbery, animated face and a corona of wavy gray hair, which he wears wet-combed back in a modified old-time pompadour.
    • 2015, Rawles Marie Lumumba, chapter 4, in Duskfall (Nightshade; book 1), [s.l.]: Takaboo Books, →ISBN:
      Vigil sat across from her, leaning against the wall of what looked like a cave, his corona glowing dimly.
  6. (biology) Any appendage of an organism that resembles a crown or corona (sense 4.1).
    • 1740, [Patrick] Blair, “The Osteology of an Elephant, with a Brief Account of Its Parts”, in Baddam, Memoirs of the Royal Society; Being a New Abridgment of the Philosophical Transactions: [], volume V, London: [] G. Smith, [], and sold by T[homas] Cooper, []; and W[alter] Shropshire, [], OCLC 960076972, pages 317 and 318:
      [page 317] The lower jaw conſiſts of one large bone, with fore and hinder part, and five proceſſes; viz. two Condyles [], two proceſſes of the Corona [], and one proceſs of the chin [] [page 318] [T]his Sinus deſcends obliquely nine inches from the neck of the condyle, till it comes to the root of the teeth []; which ſpace does not appear ſo large in the figure, becauſe of the poſition of the jaw; and from the fore-part of the Coronæ backwards, till the jaw become thick, five inches and ⅓; []
    1. (botany) A ring or set of appendages of adaxial tissue arising from the corolla or the outer edge of the stamens, present in some plants (Narcissus, Passiflora, etc.); a paraperigonium.
      • 1838, George Don, A General History of the Dichleamydeous Plants, [], volume IV (Corollifloræ), London: [] [Gilbert & Rivington] for J. G. and F. Rivington; [], page 122, column 2:
        Pentándria, Digynia. All as in Stapèlia; but the corolla is tuberculate, and the branches of the plant warted; and the outer corona of the corolla lacerately multifid.
    2. (zoology)
      1. An annular ciliated organ on the head of rotifers, used for locomotion and sweeping food into the mouth.
        • 1979, R[obert] McNeill Alexander, “Rotifers”, in The Invertebrates, Cambridge, Cambridgeshire: Cambridge University Press, →ISBN, page 230:
          It [Epiphanes] has a ciliated corona at its anterior end and tapers to a narrow foot at the posterior end. The cilia of the corona are arranged more or less in two rings, with the mouth in the gap between them.
      2. The main body of the test of an echinoid, consisting of ambulacral and interambulacral areas.
        • 1983, D. K. Richter; R. Sedat, “Brackish-water Oncoids Composed of Blue-green and Red Algae from a Pleistocene Terrace near Corinth, Greece”, in Tadeusz M. Peryt, editor, Coated Grains, Berlin; Heidelberg: Springer-Verlag, DOI:10.1007/978-3-642-68869-0, →ISBN, part IV (Oncoids), page 306:
          In coronae of the sea urchin Echinocyamus pusillus in the marine bed overlying the oncoid layer, an original Mg0.10–0.13-calcite was gradually replaced during diagenesis by a Mg0.03–0.05-calcite [].
      3. The crown of a crinoid, consisting of a cuplike central body (theca) and a set of arms.
    3. (virology) A fringe of large, bulbous surface projections on coronaviruses, formed by viral spike peplomers, creating an appearance reminiscent of the solar corona.
      • 1972 October, Lawrence S. Sturman; Kenneth K. Takemoto, “Enhanced Growth of a Murine Coronavirus in Transformed Mouse Cells”, in Infection and Immunity[2], volume 6, number 4, Washington, D.C.: American Society for Microbiology, ISSN 0019-9567, OCLC 749232400, archived from the original on 22 March 2020, page 501, column 1:
        Coronaviruses are medium-sized, enveloped, ribonucleic acid viruses which, in negatively stained preparations, appear round and bear a corona of irregular, petal-shaped surface projections.
  7. (electricity) A luminous appearance caused by corona discharge, often seen as a bluish glow in the air adjacent to pointed metal conductors carrying high voltages.
    • 2004, U[lrich] Kogelschatz; Yu S. Akishev; A. P. Napartovich, “History of Non-equilibrium Air Discharges”, in K. H. Becker, U[lrich] Kogelschatz, K. H. Schoenbach, and R. J. Barker, editors, Non-equilibrium Air Plasmas at Atmospheric Pressure (Institute of Physics Series in Plasma Physics), Bristol; Philadelphia, Pa.: Institute of Physics Publishing, →ISBN, page 42:
      An appearance of a corona may produce useful or undesirable effects. For instance, a corona arising spontaneously around high-voltage wires of an electrical power transmission line results in a loss of electrical energy. On the other hand, coronas are widely used in many practical applications like dust collection with electrical precipitators, atmospheric pressure non-thermal plasma surface treatment of polymers, cleaning of exhausted gases, etc.
  8. (meteorology) A circle or set of circles visible around a bright celestial object, especially the Sun or the Moon, attributable to an optical phenomenon produced by the diffraction of its light by small water droplets or tiny ice crystals.
    • 1854, Walter Stanhope Sherwill, “Notes upon Some Atmospherical Phenomena Observed at Darjiling in the Himalayah Mountains, during the Summer of 1852”, in Journal of the Asiatic Society of Bengal, volume XXIII, number LXV, Calcutta: [] J. Thomas, Baptist Mission Press, published 1855, OCLC 1047491870, pages 49 and 50:
      [page 49] Upon this true "mackarel sky" was depicted one of those glorious coronæ, only seen at great elevations or in high Latitudes. [] [page 50] The corona was composed of two colours, violet on the edge nearest to the sun and red on the outer edge, the two colours blending together and forming a neutral tint in the middle of the corona; the order here observed with regard to the colours is similar to that observed in the rainbow.
    • 1868, Elias Loomis, “Optical Meteorology”, in A Treatise on Meteorology. [], New York, N.Y.: Harper & Brothers, [], OCLC 839842645, section IV (Coronæ), pages 214 and 215:
      [page 214, paragraph 423] The sun and moon, when partially covered by light, fleecy clouds, are often seen encircled by one or more colored rings, which are called coronæ. [] In order to examine coronæ about the sun, it is best to view them by reflection from a blackened mirror, by which means the brilliancy of the sun's light is very much reduced. [] [page 215, paragraph 425] Coronæ are produced by the diffraction of the rays of light in their passage through the small intervals between the particles of condensed vapor in a cloud.
    • 2013, Alfred Grossmith Mason, “14 September 1942”, in Julie Grossmith Deltrice, editor, Arctic Warriors: A Personal Account of Convoy PQ18, Barnsley, South Yorkshire: Pen & Sword Maritime, Pen & Sword Books, →ISBN, page 55:
      The increasing light eventually erases the moon's glowing corona, her pendant chandelier of light pales into insignificance as the new day breaks.
  9. (mineralogy) A mineral zone, consisting of one or more minerals, which surrounds another mineral or lies at the interface of two minerals, typically in a radial arrangement; a reaction rim.
    • 2017, J. Theo Kloprogge; Robert Lavinsky, “Introduction: Geological Examples”, in Photo Atlas of Mineral Pseudomorphism, Amsterdam; Kidlington, Oxfordshire: Elsevier, →ISBN, figure 1.45 caption, page 67:
      Green hornblende is abundant at the rims of chlorite coronas in contact with amphibole-filled cracks, whereas it is minor (but not absent) in coronas in contact with chlorite-filled cracks.
  10. (pathology) A manifestation of secondary syphilis, consisting of papular lesions along the hairline, often bordering the scalp in the manner of a crown.
    Synonyms: corona veneris, crown of Venus
    • [1750?], [John Arbuthnot], “[The History of John Bull.] Jack’s Charms, or the Method by which He Gained Peg’s Heart.”, in The History of John Bull. [], London: D[aniel] Midwinter and A. Tonson [], OCLC 723424047, part II, page 60:
      Jack had a moſt ſcandalous tongue, and perſuaded Peg that all mankind, beſides himſelf, were pox'd by that ſcarlet-faced whore, Signiora Bubonia. “As for his brother Lord Peter, the tokens were evident on him, blotches, ſcabs, and the corona. []
  11. (Ancient Rome, historical) A crown or garland bestowed among the Romans as a reward for distinguished services.
    • 1842, Leonhard Schmitz, “LEMNISCUS (λημνίσκος)”, in William Smith, editor, A Dictionary of Greek and Roman Antiquities, London: [] [Samuel Bentley] for Taylor and Walton, [], OCLC 1051596824, page 557, column 2:
      From the remark of Servius [i.e., Maurus Servius Honoratus] (ad Aen. v. 269) it appears that coronae adorned with lemnisci were a greater distinction than those without them.
    • 1997 January, Lawrence Keppie, “Military Service in the Late Republic: The Evidence of Inscriptions and Sculpture”, in Journal of Roman Military Equipment Studies, volume 8, Ryton, Tyne and Wear: M. C. Bishop, ISSN 0961-3684, OCLC 715103087, page 8, column 1:
      Funerary inscriptions of soldiers under the Empire are frequently accompanied by representation of the dona militaria awarded during service. We instantly recognise depictions of torques, armillae, phalerae (often attached to a special harness), and various types of coronae.
    • 2004, Sara Pendergast; Tom Pendergast, Sarah Hermsen, editor, Fashion, Costume, and Culture: Clothing, Headwear, Body Decorations, and Footwear through the Ages, volume 1, Detroit, Mich.: UXL, →ISBN, page 183:
      Though men typically did not wear hats, they could wear a ceremonial form of headwear known as a corona, or crown. Like many areas of Roman dress, there were strict rules about wearing coronas.
Derived terms[edit]
Related terms[edit]
Descendants[edit]
  • Japanese: コロナ (korona)
Translations[edit]

Verb[edit]

corona (third-person singular simple present coronas, present participle coronaing, simple past and past participle coronaed)

  1. (transitive, rare) To surround with a luminous or crownlike ring like the solar corona.
    • 1977, Richard Beilby, Gunner: A Novel of the Retreat from Crete, London: Angus and Robertson, →ISBN, page 285:
      The belly dancer shimmied on to the tiny floor, all flashing eyes, black hair coronaed with winking brilliants, undulating bare flesh with tasselled breasts and a turquoise G-string and an imitation ruby in her navel: she was barefooted, wearing a massive glittering anklet which made her look very Circassian and wanton.
    • 2010, China Miéville, chapter 39, in Kraken: An Anatomy, New York, N.Y.: Ballantine Books, →ISBN, page 234:
      He was surrounded, encauled, coronaed with whispering figures. They fleeted in and out of visibility, made of dark light. They entered his body and exited it, they faded up, they ebbed out.
    • 2015, China Miéville, “In the Slopes”, in Three Moments of an Explosion: Stories, London: Picador, →ISBN, pages 64–65:
      The creatures lay with the humans, dead islanders alongside them. They'd worked with them. Worshipped with them, the scientists said, looking anew at the shards of illustration still visible, the extraterrestrial and the human at prayer together, coronaed, altar-top boxes glowing.
Derived terms[edit]
Translations[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

A clipping of coronavirus, ultimately from etymology 1.[2]

Noun[edit]

corona (countable and uncountable, plural coronas)

  1. (informal, also attributively) A coronavirus, especially SARS-CoV-2.
    Synonym: rona (SARS-CoV-2, informal)
    The recent surge of deaths due to corona reveals the shortcomings of our current healthcare system.
    • 1981 January, W. Arnold; M. Klein, J. B. Wang, W. A. K. Schmidt, H. J. Trampisch, “Coronavirus-associated Antibodies in Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma and Infectious Mononucleosis”, in European Archives of Oto-Rhino-Laryngology[3], volume 232, number 2, Berlin; Heidelberg: Springer, DOI:10.1007/BF00505035, ISSN 0937-4477, OCLC 849298925, archived from the original on 9 May 2020, page 175:
      Similar to the way in which EBV nuclear antigens can be identified by immunofluorescence microscopy in NPC tumor cells with the EBNA test, corona antigens can be demonstrated in the cytoplasm of tumor cells of the same patient. A possible non-specific reaction could be excluded by use of animal corona antisera.
    • 2015 April 16, Ben Berkhout; Formijn van Hemert, “On the Biased Nucleotide Composition of the Human Coronavirus RNA Genome”, in Virus Research: An International Journal of Molecular and Cellular Virology[4], volume 202, Amsterdam: Elsevier, DOI:10.1016/j.virusres.2014.11.031, ISSN 0168-1702, OCLC 67282352, PMID 25656063, archived from the original on 16 March 2021, page 46:
      Although this study was restricted to the human coronaviruses, these basic properties apply to all known animal and human coronas (results not shown).
    • 2020 May 5, Sankarshan Thakur, “A mildewed life: State of play: The migrant is trapped between the home and the world”, in The Telegraph[5], Kolkata, West Bengal: ABP, OCLC 271717941, archived from the original on 10 May 2020:
      He collapsed at the approach to his village. The villagers would not help, not admit him anywhere in. They were spooked, he may have been carrying corona. He died, and his remains were not let in either. Doctors were called, a test was done. The cadaver tested negative.
  2. (informal, also attributively) A disease caused by a coronavirus, especially COVID-19.
    She caught corona last week.
    • 2018 March–April, Adel F. Almutairi; Abdallah A. Adlan; Hanan H. Balkhy; Oraynab A. Abbas; Alexander M. Clark, “‘It feels like I’m the dirtiest person in the world.’: Exploring the Experiences of Healthcare Providers who Survived MERS-CoV in Saudi Arabia”, in Journal of Infection and Public Health[6], volume 11, number 2, Amsterdam: Elsevier, DOI:10.1016/j.jiph.2017.06.011, ISSN 1876-035X, OCLC 705371585, page 188, column 2:
      The MERS outbreak in the hospital created widespread fear and panic among healthcare providers and other employees. [] For example, participants’ traumatic experience is illustrated by the quote below: / “Neglect is pain … prejudice is there, it hurts, also … unbelievable human ignorance. There was one person who is in administration here, who was scared to call me because she might get Corona over the phone.”
    • 2020 May 8, Nazia Parveen, “Six-week-old baby believed to be England’s youngest coronavirus victim”, in Katharine Viner, editor, The Guardian[7], London: Guardian News & Media, ISSN 0261-3077, OCLC 229952407, archived from the original on 9 March 2021:
      His wife, Varda, told Geo News: “Tariq passed away in the blessed month of Ramadan in the line of duty. Even after he had developed symptoms of corona and isolated at home, he continued to do telephone clinics.”
Alternative forms[edit]
Derived terms[edit]
Translations[edit]

Etymology 3[edit]

Borrowed from Italian corona.

Noun[edit]

corona (plural coronas or corone)

  1. (poetry) A series of sonnets linked together such that the last word of each is the first word of the next.
    • 1889 May, F. M. Warren, “The Sonnet. Morfologia del Sonetto nei secoli xiii e xiv. L. Biadene [Studj di Filologia Romanza, Fasc. 10.]”, in A. Marshall Elliott, editor, Modern Language Notes, volume IV, Baltimore, Md.: [Johns Hopkins University Press], ISSN 0026-7910, OCLC 1201539848, column 308:
      A favorite and most attractive combination is that of the corona or series of sonnets, employed to frame or develop some one theme. A list of these corone is given by Biadene, who selects and publishes from among them a series of three by Petrarch, and the famous corona of the months by Folgore da San Gemignano.
    • 1997, Michael R. G. Spiller, The Sonnet Sequence: A Study of Its Strategies (Studies in Literary Themes and Genres; 13), New York, N.Y.: Twayne Publishers, →ISBN, page 144:
      But the poets of Siena, and particularly the Academy of the Intronati, found the proper way of constructing coronas—since the ones mentioned above should really be called sequences ['catene'] rather than coronas.
    • 2000, Mary B. Moore, “The Labyrinth of Style: Lady Mary Wroth and the Idea of Petrarchism”, in Desiring Voices: Women Sonneteers and Petrarchism, Carbondale; Edwardsville, Ill.: Southern Illinois University Press, →ISBN, page 125:
      [Lady Mary] Wroth alludes to these contexts as the corona of sonnets that crowns the sequence opens: "In this strang labourinth how shall I turne?" (Wroth, Poems 127).
    • 2015, Mary B. Moore, “Robert Sidney’s Poetry”, in Margaret P. Hannay, Mary Ellen Lamb, and Michael G. Brennan, editors, The Ashgate Research Companion to The Sidneys, 1500–1700, volume 2 (Literature), Farnham, Surrey; Burlington, Vt.: Ashgate Publishing, →ISBN, part VI (Poetry), page 250:
      Both sets of echoes derive from the poets' first poems, and since first poems in Petrarchan sequences set stylistic, tonal, and thematic expectations, Robert [Sidney]'s double allusion to first poems should color readings of this, the first poem of his corona.
Translations[edit]

Etymology 4[edit]

Borrowed from Spanish La Corona (literally The Crown), a brand of cigars from Havana, Cuba.[3]

Noun[edit]

corona (plural coronas)

  1. A long, straight-sided cigar with a blunt, rounded end.
    • 1977, Samuel Birnkrant, Mama, Say ‘I Do’: (Formerly Titled ‘A Whisper in God’s Ear’): A Comedy in Three Acts, Schulenburg, Tex.: I. E. Clark Publications, →ISBN, Act I, page 22:
      HOWARD: [Entering; cheerfully] Got your coronas, Mr. Goldman! / GOLDMAN: [Glumly, taking the proffered cigars] Thanks, Howie. [Puts all but one in pocket.] / HOWARD: Where's Ma? / GOLDMAN: [Indicating with cigar] Inside the bedroom.
Alternative forms[edit]
Translations[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ corona, n.1”, in OED Online Paid subscription required, Oxford, Oxfordshire: Oxford University Press, March 2021; “corona1, n.”, in Lexico, Dictionary.com; Oxford University Press, 2019–present.
  2. ^ corona, n.3”, in OED Online Paid subscription required, Oxford, Oxfordshire: Oxford University Press, July 2020; “corona2, n.”, in Lexico, Dictionary.com; Oxford University Press, 2019–present.
  3. ^ Corona, n.2”, in OED Online Paid subscription required, Oxford, Oxfordshire: Oxford University Press, December 2020; “corona3, n.”, in Lexico, Dictionary.com; Oxford University Press, 2019–present.

Further reading[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Aragonese[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin corona (crown).

Noun[edit]

corona f (plural coronas)

  1. crown

References[edit]


Catalan[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Old Occitan corona, from Latin corōna, from Ancient Greek κορώνη (korṓnē, garland, wreath).

Noun[edit]

corona f (plural corones)

  1. crown (decorative headgear)
  2. crown (imperial or regal power, or those who wield it)
  3. crown (various currencies)
Related terms[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

See the etymology of the main entry.

Verb[edit]

corona

  1. third-person singular present indicative form of coronar
  2. second-person singular imperative form of coronar

Further reading[edit]


Dutch[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ˌkoːˈroː.naː/
  • Hyphenation: co‧ro‧na
  • Rhymes: -oːnaː

Etymology 1[edit]

Borrowed from Latin corōna, from Ancient Greek κορώνη (korṓnē).

Noun[edit]

corona f (plural corona's)

  1. (astronomy) corona
Derived terms[edit]
Related terms[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

A clipping of coronavirus.

Noun[edit]

corona f or n (uncountable)

  1. (informal, usually without definite article) Coronavirus or coronavirus disease, particularly COVID-19.
  2. (informal, usually without definite article) The 2019-2021 COVID-19 pandemic.
    Veel bedrijven gingen failliet tijdens corona.Many companies went bankrupt during the 2019-2021 COVID-19 pandemic.
Derived terms[edit]

French[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

corona m (uncountable)

  1. (informal) Clipping of coronavirus.
    • 2020 June 1, “« Le corona, c’est en Europe ou en Chine, pas ici » : à Kinshasa, la difficile sensibilisation au Covid-19”, in Le Monde[8], archived from the original on 14 January 2021:
      « Ici au Congo, il n’y a que la malaria et la simple fièvre. Le corona, c’est en Europe, en Chine. Nous avons des anticorps depuis nos ancêtres » affirme l’un d’entre eux, Hussein, à l’AFP.
      (please add an English translation of this quote)
    • 2020 July 18, “« Il est là le corona ! »: au canal Saint-Denis, un millier de migrants sans mesures barrière”, in L'Express[9], archived from the original on 14 January 2021:
      « Regardez ici, il n’y a pas un mètre, on est les uns sur les autres ! Ici c’est du concentré de corona (…) Il est là le corona ! », déplore Abdul Qahar, Afghan âgé de 20 ans, en montrant les tentes à touche-touche, les détritus au sol et les toilettes à ciel ouvert.
      (please add an English translation of this quote)
    • 2020 September 24, “Coronavirus: ces célébrités, dont "la fille la plus détestée des Pays-Bas", qui lancent une campagne anti-mesures COVID-19”, in RTBF[10], archived from the original on 10 November 2020:
      Que dit-elle ? "Alleen samen krijgen wij de overheiden[sic] [should be "overheid"] onder controle" (Ensemble, nous pouvons avoir le contrôle des autorités) un slogan détourné de celui lancé au printemps par le gouvernement et qui disait : "Ensemble, nous pouvons avoir le contrôle sur le corona".
      (please add an English translation of this quote)

Italian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin corōna, from Ancient Greek κορώνη (korṓnē, garland, wreath). Compare also cruna, probably from a derivative of the same Latin word.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

corona f (plural corone)

  1. crown (of a king, pope etc) (also of a tooth)
  2. crown (various units of currency)
  3. coronet
  4. wreath, chaplet
  5. (astronomy) corona (of a star etc)

Derived terms[edit]

Descendants[edit]

Verb[edit]

corona

  1. third-person singular present indicative of coronare
  2. second-person singular imperative of coronare

Anagrams[edit]


Latin[edit]

corōna (chaplet, wreath)

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from Ancient Greek κορώνη (korṓnē, a type of sea-bird, perhaps shearwater; a crow; anything curved or hooked (like a door handle or the tip of a bow); a type of crown), from Proto-Indo-European *(s)ker- (to turn, bend).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

corōna f (genitive corōnae); first declension

  1. garland, chaplet, laurel, or wreath; presented to athletes, the gods, or the dead
    • c. 200 BCE, Plautus, Menaechmi 3.1.16:
      sed quid egō videō? Menaechmus cum corōnā exit forās
      But why do I see Menaechmus here? He's coming out of doors with a chaplet on?
  2. crown
    • c. 200 BCE, Plautus, Menaechmi 5.5.38:
      at ego tē sacram corōnam surrupuisse Iovī sciō
      And I know that you stole the sacred crown of Jupiter.
  3. circle (of people), assembly

Declension[edit]

First-declension noun.

Case Singular Plural
Nominative corōna corōnae
Genitive corōnae corōnārum
Dative corōnae corōnīs
Accusative corōnam corōnās
Ablative corōnā corōnīs
Vocative corōna corōnae

Related terms[edit]

Descendants[edit]

Borrowings
Unsorted borrowings

References[edit]

  • corona in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short, A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1879
  • corona in Charlton T. Lewis, An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers, 1891
  • corona in Charles du Fresne du Cange’s Glossarium Mediæ et Infimæ Latinitatis (augmented edition, 1883–1887)
  • corona in Gaffiot, Félix, Dictionnaire illustré Latin-Français, Hachette, 1934
  • Carl Meissner; Henry William Auden, Latin Phrase-Book[11], London: Macmillan and Co., 1894
    • to elicit loud applause: clamores (coronae) facere, excitare
    • to sell a prisoner of war as a slave: aliquem sub corona vendere (B. G. 3. 16)
    • the free men are sold as slaves: libera corpora sub corona (hasta) veneunt (B. G. 3. 16. 4)
  • corona in The Perseus Project, Perseus Encyclopedia[12], 1999
  • corona in Harry Thurston Peck, editor, Harper's Dictionary of Classical Antiquities, New York: Harper & Brothers, 1898
  • corona in William Smith et al., editor, A Dictionary of Greek and Roman Antiquities, London: William Wayte. G. E. Marindin, 1890

Leonese[edit]

Etymology[edit]

(This etymology is missing or incomplete. Please add to it, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.)

Noun[edit]

corona f (plural coronas)

  1. crown

References[edit]


Old English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin corōna, from Ancient Greek κορώνη (korṓnē, garland, wreath).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

corōna m

  1. crown

Declension[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

References[edit]


Old Occitan[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin corōna, from Ancient Greek κορώνη (korṓnē, garland, wreath).

Noun[edit]

corona f (oblique plural coronas, nominative singular corona, nominative plural coronas)

  1. crown

Descendants[edit]


Spanish[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /koˈɾona/, [koˈɾo.na]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Old Spanish corona, from Latin corōna (crown), from Ancient Greek κορώνη (korṓnē, garland, wreath).

Noun[edit]

corona f (plural coronas)

  1. crown
  2. (heraldry) crown
  3. crown (various units of currency)
  4. (of a star) corona
  5. wreath; ring, circle
    una corona de Navidada Christmas wreath
  6. sprocket; (bicycle sprockets) cassette
  7. (mechanics) larger part of a pair of gear wheels
    Synonym: rueda dentada
    Antonym: piñón
  8. washer
    Synonym: arandela
Derived terms[edit]
Related terms[edit]
Descendants[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

See the etymology of the main entry.

Verb[edit]

corona

  1. Informal second-person singular () affirmative imperative form of coronar.
  2. Formal second-person singular (usted) present indicative form of coronar.
  3. Third-person singular (él, ella, also used with usted?) present indicative form of coronar.

Etymology 3[edit]

Clipping of coronavirus.

Noun[edit]

corona m (uncountable)

  1. (informal) coronavirus

Further reading[edit]