crucial

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English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

1706, from French crucial, a medical term for ligaments of the knee (which cross each other), from Latin crux, crucis (cross) (English crux), from the Proto-Indo-European *(s)ker- (to turn, to bend).

The meaning “decisive, critical” is extended from a logical term, Instantias Crucis, adopted by Francis Bacon in his influential Novum Organum (1620); the notion is of cross fingerboard signposts at forking roads, thus a requirement to choose.[1]

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ˈkɹuː.ʃəl/
  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -uːʃəl

Adjective[edit]

crucial (comparative more crucial, superlative most crucial)

  1. Essential or decisive for determining the outcome or future of something; extremely important; vital.
    Synonyms: see Thesaurus:important
    The battle of Tali-Ihantala in 1944 is one of the crucial moments in the history of Finland.
    A secure supply of crude oil is crucial for any modern nation, let alone a superpower.
    • 2014 March 7, Nicole Vulser, “Perfume manufacturers must cope with the scarcity of precious supplies”, in The Guardian Weekly, volume 190, number 13, page 30:
      The perfume industry is facing a major problem: maintaining constant levels of quality is crucial, but it is increasingly difficult to obtain a regular supply of all the necessary natural ingredients.
    • 2018, Clarence Green; James Lambert, “Advancing disciplinary literacy through English for academic purposes: Discipline-specific wordlists, collocations and word families for eight secondary subjects”, in Journal of English for Academic Purposes, volume 35, DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jeap.2018.07.004, page 106:
      Vocabulary provides a foundation from which grammar, phonology, and morphology emerge, and in a subject area it provides access to conceptual knowledge. Vocabulary selection for pedagogical purposes is therefore crucial.
  2. (archaic) Cruciform or cruciate; cross-shaped.
  3. (slang, especially Jamaican, Bermuda) Very good; excellent; particularly applied to reggae music.
    Delbert Wilkins is the most crucial pirate radio DJ in Brixton.

Derived terms[edit]

Related terms[edit]

Translations[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Francis Bacon (1620) Novum Organum [New Organon] (in Latin), XXXVI: “Inter praerogativas instantiarum, ponemus loco decimo quarto Instantias Crucis; translato vocabulo a Crucibus, quae erectae in biviis indicant et signant viarum separationes.”

French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From a root of Latin crux (cross).

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

crucial (feminine singular cruciale, masculine plural cruciaux, feminine plural cruciales)

  1. cruciform
  2. crucial, critical, vital

Further reading[edit]


Portuguese[edit]

Etymology[edit]

(This etymology is missing or incomplete. Please add to it, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.)

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): (Brazil) /kɾu.siˈaw/, [kɾu.siˈaʊ̯]
  • IPA(key): (Portugal) /kɾuˈsjal/, [kɾuˈsjaɫ]

  • Hyphenation: cru‧ci‧al

Adjective[edit]

crucial m or f (plural cruciais, comparable)

  1. crucial

Quotations[edit]

For quotations using this term, see Citations:crucial.


Romanian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From French crucial

Adjective[edit]

crucial m or n (feminine singular crucială, masculine plural cruciali, feminine and neuter plural cruciale)

  1. pivotal

Declension[edit]


Spanish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From English crucial.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): (Spain) /kɾuˈθjal/, [kɾuˈθjal]
  • IPA(key): (Latin America) /kɾuˈsjal/, [kɾuˈsjal]

Adjective[edit]

crucial (plural cruciales)

  1. crucial