culpa

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See also: culpá and culpă

English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Latin

Noun[edit]

culpa ‎(plural culpae)

  1. (law) negligence or fault, as distinguishable from dolus (deceit, fraud), which implies intent, culpa being imputable to defect of intellect, dolus to defect of heart
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Wharton to this entry?)

Part or all of this entry has been imported from the 1913 edition of Webster’s Dictionary, which is now free of copyright and hence in the public domain. The imported definitions may be significantly out of date, and any more recent senses may be completely missing.


Catalan[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin culpa.

Noun[edit]

culpa f ‎(plural culpes)

  1. fault, blame
  2. guilt

Derived terms[edit]


Latin[edit]

Etymology[edit]

EB1911 - Volume 01 - Page 001 - 1.svg This entry lacks etymological information. If you are familiar with the origin of this term, please add it to the page per etymology instructions. You can also discuss it at the Etymology Scriptorium.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

culpa f ‎(genitive culpae); first declension

  1. fault, defect
  2. crime

Inflection[edit]

First declension.

Case Singular Plural
nominative culpa culpae
genitive culpae culpārum
dative culpae culpīs
accusative culpam culpās
ablative culpā culpīs
vocative culpa culpae

Descendants[edit]

Verb[edit]

culpā

  1. second-person singular present active imperative of culpō

References[edit]

  • culpa in Charlton T. Lewis & Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • culpa in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • CULPA in Charles du Fresne du Cange’s Glossarium Mediæ et Infimæ Latinitatis (augmented edition, 1883–1887)
  • culpa in Félix Gaffiot (1934), Dictionnaire Illustré Latin-Français, Paris: Hachette.
  • Meissner, Carl; Auden, Henry William (1894) Latin Phrase-Book[1], London: Macmillan and Co.
    • a guilty conscience: conscientia mala or peccatorum, culpae, sceleris, delicti
    • to be conscious of no ill deed: nullius culpae sibi conscium esse
    • to be free from blame: extra culpam esse
    • to be almost culpable: affinem esse culpae
    • to put the blame on another: culpam in aliquem conferre, transferre, conicere
    • to attribute the fault to some one: culpam alicui attribuere, assignare
    • to commit some blameworthy action: culpam committere, contrahere
    • to commit some blameworthy action: facinus, culpam in se admittere
    • to bear the blame of a thing: culpam alicuius rei sustinere
    • to exonerate oneself from blame: culpam a se amovere
    • (ambiguous) to be at fault; to blame; culpable: in culpa esse
    • (ambiguous) some one is to blame in a matter; it is some one's fault: culpa alicuius rei est in aliquo
    • (ambiguous) it is my fault: mea culpa est
    • (ambiguous) to be free from blame: culpa carere, vacare
    • (ambiguous) to be free from blame: abesse a culpa
    • (ambiguous) to be almost culpable: prope abesse a culpa
  • culpa in Harry Thurston Peck, editor (1898) Harper's Dictionary of Classical Antiquities, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • culpa in William Smith et al., editor (1890) A Dictionary of Greek and Roman Antiquities, London: William Wayte. G. E. Marindin

Portuguese[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Portuguese culpa, from Latin culpa.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

culpa f (plural culpas)

  1. fault

Quotations[edit]

For usage examples of this term, see Citations:culpa.


Spanish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin culpa

Noun[edit]

culpa f ‎(plural culpas)

  1. fault
  2. guilt

Derived terms[edit]

Related terms[edit]

Verb[edit]

culpa

  1. Informal second-person singular () affirmative imperative form of culpar.
  2. Formal second-person singular (usted) present indicative form of culpar.
  3. Third-person singular (él, ella, also used with usted?) present indicative form of culpar.