cum

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See also: CUM, cùm, and -cum

English[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Latin cum ‎(with).

Preposition[edit]

cum

  1. Used in indicating a thing with two roles, functions, or natures, or a thing that has changed from one to another.
    He built a bus-cum-greenhouse that made a bold statement, but the plants in it didn't live very long.
    • 1926-1950, George Bernard Shaw, Collected Letters: 1926-1950[1], University of California/Viking, published 1985, page 31:
      He is too good an actor to need that sort of tomfoolery: the effect will be far better if he is a credible mining camp elder-cum-publican.
    • 2001 Nov/Dec, David Sachs, “LET THEM EAT BITS”, in American Spectator, volume 34, number 8, page 78:
      The banner shows a yellowed silhouette of a boy (possibly Calvin, of Calvin & Hobbes) urinating on an EU flag. Sites such as this show the full power of the Internet as a propaganda medium cum travel service cum organizing tool. Oh, and nightlife directory.

Conjunction[edit]

cum

  1. Used in indicating a thing with two or more roles, functions, or natures, or a thing that has changed from one to another.
    But instead of being a salesperson cum barista cum waitress merely serving the wordsmiths, I'm one of them, reading her latest baby out loud.
Quotations[edit]
Translations[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

Variant of come.

Noun[edit]

cum ‎(uncountable)

  1. (informal) Semen.
  2. (slang) An ejaculation.
  3. (slang) Female ejaculatory discharge.
Synonyms[edit]
Derived terms[edit]
Translations[edit]
The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Help:How to check translations.

Verb[edit]

cum ‎(third-person singular simple present cums, present participle cumming, simple past came or cummed, past participle came or cum or (nonstandard) cummed)

  1. (slang) To have an orgasm, to feel the sensation of an orgasm.
  2. (slang) To ejaculate.
    • 1997 July 14, Harold Perrineau as Augustus Hill, Visits, Conjugal, and Otherwise (Oz), season 1, episode 2:
      I got no sensation down there, so I don't know when I'm hard, I don't know when I cum. My wife's gotta tell me.
Synonyms[edit]

(have an orgasm): climax

Translations[edit]

Usage notes[edit]

Many style guides and editors recommend the spelling come for verb uses (to orgasm/to ejaculate) while strictly allowing the spelling cum for the noun (semen/female ejaculatory discharge). Both spellings are sometimes found in either the noun or verb sense, however. Others prefer to distinguish in formality, using come for any formal usage and cum only in slang, erotic or pornographic contexts.[1]

Anagrams[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Glossophilia

Aromanian[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Vulgar Latin *quomo, from Latin quōmodo.

Adverb[edit]

cum

  1. how

Conjunction[edit]

cum

  1. how

Irish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Irish cummaid.

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

cum ‎(present analytic cumann, future analytic cumfaidh, verbal noun cumadh, past participle cumtha)

  1. form, shape
  2. compose
  3. devise
  4. invent
  5. limit, ration

Inflection[edit]

Mutation[edit]

Irish mutation
Radical Lenition Eclipsis
cum chum gcum
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every
possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

Latin[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Proto-Italic *kom, from Proto-Indo-European *ḱóm ‎(next to, at, with, along). Cognate with Proto-Germanic *ga- ‎(co-), Proto-Slavic *sъ(n) ‎(with), Persian prefix هم ‎(ham, co-, same), Proto-Germanic *hansō. More at hanse.

Preposition[edit]

cum ‎(+ ablative)

  1. with
    Titus cum familiā habitat.‎ ― Titus lives with his family.
    magnā cum laude‎ ― with great praise
Derived terms[edit]
Descendants[edit]
  • Macanese: co
  • Megleno Romanian: cu
  • Mirandese: cun
  • Neapolitan: cu
  • Old Portuguese: con
  • Piedmontese: cun
  • Portuguese: com
  • Romagnol: cun
  • Romanian: cu
  • Romansch: cun
  • Sardinian: chin, cun
  • Sicilian: cu
  • Spanish: con
  • Venetian: co

Etymology 2[edit]

From Old Latin quom, from Proto-Indo-European *kʷóm, accusative of *kʷos, *kʷis. Confer with its feminine form quam, as in num-nam, tum-tam.

Alternative forms[edit]

Conjunction[edit]

cum ‎(+ subjunctive)

  1. when
  2. because
  3. although
Usage notes[edit]
  • In the sense of when, if there is no causal link between the verb in the dependent clause and the verb in the main clause (sometimes called an inverted cum-clause, as the 'main action' of the sentence occurs in the dependent clause), the indicative is used rather than the subjunctive.
    per viam ambulābāmus cum pugnam vīdimus. [not *vīderīmus] — "We were walking through the street when we happened to witness a fight."
Derived terms[edit]
Coordinate terms[edit]

References[edit]

  • (preposition) cum in Charlton T. Lewis & Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • (conjunction) cum in Charlton T. Lewis & Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • cum in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • CUM in Charles du Fresne du Cange’s Glossarium Mediæ et Infimæ Latinitatis (augmented edition, 1883–1887)
  • cum in Félix Gaffiot (1934), Dictionnaire Illustré Latin-Français, Paris: Hachette.
  • Meissner, Carl; Auden, Henry William (1894) Latin Phrase-Book[2], London: Macmillan and Co.
    • a storm accompanied by heavy claps of thunder: tempestas cum magno fragore (caeli) tonitribusque (Liv. 1. 16)
    • to have the same boundaries; to be coterminous: continentem esse terrae or cum terra (Fam. 15. 2. 2)
    • at the same moment that, precisely when: eo ipso tempore, cum; tum ipsum, cum
    • occasions arise for..: incidunt tempora, cum
    • I have not seen you for five years: quinque anni sunt or sextus annus est, cum te non vidi
    • to live to see the day when..: diem videre, cum...
    • with many tears: multis cum lacrimis
    • with many tears: magno cum fletu
    • so-and-so is in a very satisfactory position; prospers: agitur praeclare, bene cum aliquo
    • under such circumstances: quae cum ita sint
    • to struggle with adversity: conflictari (cum) adversa fortuna
    • to balance a loss by anything: damnum compensare cum aliqua re
    • to form a friendship with any one: amicitiam cum aliquo jungere, facere, inire, contrahere
    • I am on good terms with a person: est or intercedit mihi cum aliquo amicitia
    • I am on bad terms with a person: sunt or intercedunt mihi cum aliquo inimicitiae
    • to be bound by the closest ties of friendship: artissimo amicitiae vinculo or summa familiaritate cum aliquo coniunctum esse
    • to be at enmity with a man: inimicitias gerere, habere, exercere cum aliquo
    • to make a person one's enemy: inimicitias cum aliquo suscipere
    • to reconcile two people; to be a mediator: in gratiam aliquem cum aliquo reducere
    • to be reconciled; to make up a quarrel: in gratiam cum aliquo redire
    • to expostulate with a person about a thing: conqueri, expostulare cum aliquo de aliqua re
    • I heard him say..: ex eo audivi, cum diceret
    • to confuse true with false: vera cum falsis confundere
    • to imbibe error from one's mother's breasts: errorem cum lacte nutricis sugere (Tusc. 3. 1. 2)
    • (1) to communicate one's plans to some one; (2) to make common cause with a person. Similarly c. causam, rationem: consilia cum aliquo communicare
    • to think over, consider a thing: secum (cum animo) reputare aliquid
    • to think over, consider a thing: considerare in, cum animo, secum aliquid
    • to enjoy close intercourse with... (of master and pupil): multum esse cum aliquo (Fam. 16. 21)
    • to be closely connected with a thing: cohaerere, coniunctum esse cum aliqua re
    • to maintain a controversy with some one: controversiam (contentionem) habere cum aliquo
    • to come to an understanding with a person: transigere aliquid cum aliquo
    • to agree with a person: consentire, idem sentire cum aliquo
    • to disagree with a person: dissentire, dissidere ab or cum aliquo
    • to be united by having a common language: eiusdem linguae societate coniunctum esse cum aliquo (De Or. 3. 59. 223)
    • to hold an altercation with a man: verbis concertare or altercari cum aliquo (B. C. 3. 19. 6)
    • to correspond with some one: colloqui cum aliquo per litteras
    • to my sorrow: cum magno meo dolore
    • my relations with him are most hospitable: mihi cum illo hospitium est, intercedit
    • to become a friend and guest of a person: hospitium cum aliquo facere, (con-)iungere
    • to associate with some one: societatem inire, facere cum aliquo
    • to be always in some one's company: assiduum esse cum aliquo
    • to be on friendly terms with a person: usu, familiaritate, consuetudine coniunctum esse cum aliquo
    • to be on friendly terms with a person: est mihi consuetudo, or usus cum aliquo
    • to be on friendly terms with a person: vivere cum aliquo
    • relations are strained between us: in simultate cum aliquo sum
    • to enter into conversation with some one: sermonem conferre, instituere, ordiri cum aliquo
    • to enter into conversation with some one: se dare in sermonem cum aliquo
    • to converse, talk with a person on a subject: sermonem habere cum aliquo de aliqua re (De Am. 1. 3)
    • to meet a person by arrangement, interview him: congredi cum aliquo
    • to speak personally to..: coram loqui (cum aliquo)
    • to shake hands with a person: dextram iungere cum aliquo, dextras inter se iungere
    • to be married to some one: nuptam esse cum aliquo or alicui
    • to separate from, divorce (of the man): divortium facere cum uxore
    • to have business relations with some one: contrahere rem or negotium cum aliquo (Cluent. 14. 41)
    • to transact, settle a matter with some one: transigere aliquid (de aliqua re) cum aliquo or inter se
    • to do no business with a man: nihil cum aliquo contrahere
    • to balance accounts with some one: rationes putare cum aliquo
    • to be content with 12 per cent at compound interest: centesimis cum anatocismo contentum esse (Att. 5. 21. 12)
    • to contend with some one for the pre-eminence: contendere cum aliquo de principatu (Nep. Arist. 1)
    • to submit a formal proposition to the people: agere cum populo (Leg. 3. 4. 10)
    • to be on a person's side (not ab alicuius partibus): ab (cum) aliquo stare (Brut. 79. 273)
    • to take some one's side: cum aliquo facere (Sull. 13. 36)
    • to conspire with some one: conspirare cum aliquo (contra aliquem)
    • to have unlimited power; to be invested with imperium: cum imperio esse (cf. XVI. 3)
    • to go to law with a person: (ex) iure, lege agere cum aliquo
    • to proceed against some one with the utmost rigour of the law; to strain the law in one's favour: summo iure agere cum aliquo (cf. summum ius, summa iniuria)
    • to live with some one on an equal footing: aequo iure vivere cum aliquo
    • to isolate a witness: aliquem a ceteris separare et in arcam conicere ne quis cum eo colloqui possit (Mil. 22. 60)
    • to join forces with some one: copias (arma) cum aliquo iungere or se cum aliquo iungere
    • to hold a high command: cum imperio esse
    • to be armed: cum telo esse
    • to begin a war with some one: bellum cum aliquo inire
    • to make war on a person: bellum gerere cum aliquo
    • to advance with the army: procedere cum exercitu
    • with wife and child: cum uxoribus et liberis
    • to come to close quarters: manum (us) conserere cum hoste
    • to come to close quarters: signa conferre cum hoste
    • to fight a pitched, orderly battle with an enemy: iusto (opp. tumultuario) proelio confligere cum hoste (Liv. 35. 4)
    • a hand-to-hand engagement ensued: tum pes cum pede collatus est (Liv. 28. 2)
    • with great loss: magno cum detrimento
    • to treat with some one about peace: agere cum aliquo de pace
    • to make peace with some one: pacem facere cum aliquo
    • to conclude a treaty with some one: pactionem facere cum aliquo (Sall. Iug. 40)
    • to conclude a treaty, an alliance: foedus facere (cum aliquo), icere, ferire
    • allow me to say: bona (cum) venia tua dixerim
    • putting aside, except: cum discessi, -eris, -eritis ab

Lojban[edit]

Rafsi[edit]

cum

  1. rafsi of cumki.

Manx[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

EB1911 - Volume 01 - Page 001 - 1.svg This entry lacks etymological information. If you are familiar with the origin of this term, please add it to the page per etymology instructions. You can also discuss it at the Etymology Scriptorium.

Verb[edit]

cum ‎(verbal noun cummal)

  1. grip, hold
  2. keep, arrest, retain
  3. contain
  4. live, inhabit
  5. celebrate

Etymology 2[edit]

EB1911 - Volume 01 - Page 001 - 1.svg This entry lacks etymological information. If you are familiar with the origin of this term, please add it to the page per etymology instructions. You can also discuss it at the Etymology Scriptorium.

Verb[edit]

cum ‎(verbal noun cummey)

  1. plan, devise
  2. fabricate, shape, mould
  3. indite

Mutation[edit]

Manx mutation
Radical Lenition Eclipsis
cum chum gum
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every
possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

Old French[edit]

Conjunction[edit]

cum

  1. Alternative form of conme

Old Irish[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Verb[edit]

·cum

  1. third-person singular present subjunctive prototonic of con·icc

Related terms[edit]

Mutation[edit]

Old Irish mutation
Radical Lenition Nasalization
·cum ·chum ·cum
pronounced with /-ɡ(ʲ)-/
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every
possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

Portuguese[edit]

Preposition[edit]

cum

  1. (Internet slang) Eye dialect spelling of com.

Quotations[edit]

For usage examples of this term, see Citations:cum.


Rohingya[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Bengali.

Noun[edit]

cum

  1. kiss

Romanian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Vulgar Latin *quomo, from Latin quōmodo.

Pronunciation[edit]

Adverb[edit]

cum

  1. how
    Cum ți-ar plăcea cafeaua?‎ ― How would you like your coffee?
    Cum se spune acela românește?‎ ― How do you say that in Romanian?

Conjunction[edit]

cum

  1. how
  2. as, since, because

Scots[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

cum

  1. to come

Scottish Gaelic[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

EB1911 - Volume 01 - Page 001 - 1.svg This entry lacks etymological information. If you are familiar with the origin of this term, please add it to the page per etymology instructions. You can also discuss it at the Etymology Scriptorium.

Verb[edit]

cum ‎(past chum, future cumaidh, verbal noun cumail, past participle cumta)

  1. keep, hold
    Cùm seo dhomhsa gu Dihaoine.‎ ― Keep this for me till Friday.
    Chùm i an taigh glan.‎ ― She kept the house clean.
    Cha do chùm e ris a’ bhargan.‎ ― He didn’t keep [his part of] the bargain.
  2. keep, continue
Derived terms[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

From Old Irish cummaid ‎(fashions, shapes, composes, determines; makes, creates, devises), from cummae ‎(act of cutting, carving, hacking, destroying, butchering; act of shaping, fashioning, composing), verbal noun of con·ben.

Verb[edit]

cum ‎(past chum, future cumaidh, verbal noun cumadh, past participle cumta)

  1. shape, form