demos

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See also: Demos and démos

English[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Ancient Greek δῆμος (dêmos, ordinary citizens, common people from a district, in a city-state).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

demos (plural demoi)

  1. (originally Ancient Greece) An ancient subdivision of Attica; (now also) a Greek municipality, an administrative area covering a city or several villages together. [from 18th c.]
  2. (political science, singular or plural) The ordinary citizens of an ancient Greek city-state; hence, the common populace of a state or district (especially a democratic one); the people. [from 18th c.]
    • 2007, Tim Blanning, The Pursuit of Glory, Penguin 2008, p. 323:
      When the demos took charge, law and order inevitably collapsed, or so they concluded.

Etymology 2[edit]

Inflected forms.

Noun[edit]

demos

  1. plural of demo

Anagrams[edit]


Galician[edit]

Noun[edit]

demos

  1. plural of demo

Verb[edit]

demos

  1. first-person plural preterite indicative of dar

Latin[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from Ancient Greek δῆμος (dêmos, [the common] people).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

dēmos m (genitive dēmī); second declension

  1. a tract of land, a demos, a deme
  2. the inhabitants of a dēmos: people, especially the common people
    • AD 77–79, Gaius Plinius Secundus (author), Karl Friedrich Theodor Mayhoff (editor), Naturalis Historia (1906), book xxxv, chapter 30:
      pinxit demon atheniensium argumento quoque ingenioso. ostendebat namque varium: iracundum iniustum inconstantem, eundem exorabilem clementem misericordem; gloriosum…, excelsum humilem, ferocem fugacemque et omnia pariter.
      In his allegorical picture of the People of Athens, he has displayed singular ingenuity in the treatment of his subject; for in representing it, he had to depict it as at once fickle, choleric, unjust, and versatile; while, again, he had equally to show its attributes of implacability and clemency, compassionateness and pride, loftiness and humility, fierceness and timidity — and all these at once. ― translation from: John Bostock, The Natural History (1855), book xxxv, chap. 36

Declension[edit]

Second-declension noun (Greek-type).

Case Singular Plural
Nominative dēmos dēmī
Genitive dēmī dēmōrum
Dative dēmō dēmīs
Accusative dēmon dēmōs
Ablative dēmō dēmīs
Vocative dēme dēmī

Synonyms[edit]

  • (tract of land): pāgus (Pure Latin)
  • (inhabitants of a demos):

Related terms[edit]

Noun[edit]

dēmōs m

  1. accusative plural of dēmos

References[edit]


Portuguese[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

 

  • Hyphenation: de‧mos

Noun[edit]

demos

  1. plural of demo

Verb[edit]

demos

  1. first-person plural (nós) preterite indicative of dar
  2. first-person plural (nós) present subjunctive of dar
  3. first-person plural (nós) affirmative imperative of dar
  4. first-person plural (nós) negative imperative of dar

Spanish[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ˈdemos/, [ˈd̪e.mos]

Noun[edit]

demos m pl

  1. plural of demo

Verb[edit]

demos

  1. First-person plural (nosotros, nosotras) present subjunctive form of dar.
  2. First-person plural (nosotros, nosotras) imperative form of dar.