derisive

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English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From the participle stem of Latin dērīdeō (I deride).

Pronunciation[edit]

  • (UK, US) IPA(key): /dɪˈɹaɪ.sɪv/, /dɪˈɹɪ.sɪv/
  • (file)

Adjective[edit]

derisive (comparative more derisive, superlative most derisive)

  1. Expressing or characterized by derision; mocking; ridiculing.
    The critic's review of the film was derisive.
  2. Deserving or provoking derision or ridicule.
    The plot of the film was so derisive that the audience began to jeer.

Synonyms[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Related terms[edit]

Translations[edit]

Noun[edit]

derisive (plural derisives)

  1. (rare) A derisive remark.
    • 1894, Samuel Rutherford Crockett, The Stickit Minister: And Some Common Men, page 173:
      The three lambs stood at bay, huddled close together, and helplessly bleated feeble derisives at the wolf who has headed them off from safety; but their polite and Englishy tone was a source of Homeric laughter to this Thersites of the Pleasance.
    • 1962, Homer Floyd Fansler, History of Tucker County, West Virginia, page 192:
      He leaped over the embankment at the river's edge in such a manner that it appeared he had been fatally hit and was down for good; the Yankees shouting such derisives as "Another damn Rebel for hell," "Goodbye, you Rebel bastard," etc., didn't go right away to rob the corpse.
    • 2017, Bogdadn Lesnik, Countering Discrimination in Social Work:
      Indeed, the power inherent in the labels attributed to them has repeatedly transformed these terms from allegedly scientific ones into colloquial derisives.

References[edit]

  • derisive in The Century Dictionary, The Century Co., New York, 1911

Anagrams[edit]