dolus

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English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin dolus (deceit, trickery); akin to Ancient Greek δόλος (dólos, bait, ruse). Compare dolose, dolosity.

Noun[edit]

dolus (uncountable)

  1. (law) Evil intent: malice or fraud.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Wharton to this entry?)

References[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Latin[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Ancient Greek δόλος (dólos, deception, trick).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

dolus m (genitive dolī); second declension

  1. trickery, deception

Inflection[edit]

Second declension.

Case Singular Plural
nominative dolus dolī
genitive dolī dolōrum
dative dolō dolīs
accusative dolum dolōs
ablative dolō dolīs
vocative dole dolī

Derived terms[edit]

Related terms[edit]

Descendants[edit]

References[edit]

  • dolus in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • dolus in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • du Cange, Charles (1883), “dolus”, in G. A. Louis Henschel, Pierre Carpentier, Léopold Favre, editors, Glossarium Mediæ et Infimæ Latinitatis (in Latin), Niort: L. Favre
  • Carl Meissner; Henry William Auden (1894) Latin Phrase-Book[1], London: Macmillan and Co.
    • by craft: per dolum (B. G. 4. 13)
    • by the aid of fraud and lies: dolis et fallaciis (Sall. Cat. 11. 2)

Old Irish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

do- +‎ lés (compare solus)

Adjective[edit]

dolus

  1. lightless, obscure

Descendants[edit]