dormir

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Asturian[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin dormīre, present active infinitive of dormiō.

Verb[edit]

dormir (first-person singular indicative present dormo, past participle dormíu)

  1. (intransitive) to sleep

Conjugation[edit]


Catalan[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Occitan dormir, from Latin dormīre, present active infinitive of dormiō, from Proto-Italic *dormiō, from Proto-Indo-European *drem- (run, sleep).

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

dormir (first-person singular present dormo, past participle dormit)

  1. (intransitive) to sleep

Conjugation[edit]

Related terms[edit]

References[edit]


French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle French dormir, from Old French dormir, from Latin dormīre, present active infinitive of dormiō (I sleep), from Proto-Italic *dormiō, from Proto-Indo-European *drem- (run, sleep).

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /dɔʁ.miʁ/
  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -iʁ

Verb[edit]

dormir

  1. (intransitive) to sleep

Conjugation[edit]

This is one of a fairly large group of irregular -ir verbs that are all conjugated the same way. Other members of this group include sortir and servir. The most significant difference between these verbs' conjugation and that of the regular -ir verbs is that these verbs' conjugation does not use the infix -iss-. Further, this conjugation has the forms (je, tu) dors and (il) dort in the present indicative and imperative, whereas a regular -ir verb would have *dormis and *dormit (as in the past historic).

Derived terms[edit]

Related terms[edit]

See also[edit]

Further reading[edit]


Interlingua[edit]

Verb[edit]

dormir

  1. (intransitive) to sleep

Conjugation[edit]


Ladin[edit]

Verb[edit]

dormir

  1. (intransitive) to sleep

Conjugation[edit]

  • Ladin conjugation varies from one region to another. Hence, the following conjugation should be considered as typical, not as exhaustive.

Middle French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old French dormir, from Latin dormiō, dormīre.

Verb[edit]

dormir

  1. (intransitive) to sleep

Descendants[edit]


Occitan[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Occitan dormir, from Latin dormīre, present active infinitive of dormiō.

Verb[edit]

dormir

  1. (intransitive) to sleep

Conjugation[edit]


Old French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin dormīre, present active infinitive of dormiō.

Verb[edit]

dormir

  1. (intransitive) to sleep

Conjugation[edit]

This verb conjugates as a third-group verb. Old French conjugation varies significantly by date and by region. The following conjugation should be treated as a guide.

Descendants[edit]


Old Occitan[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin dormīre, present active infinitive of dormiō. Gallo-Romance cognate with Old French dormir.

Verb[edit]

dormir

  1. to sleep

Descendants[edit]

References[edit]


Portuguese[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Portuguese dormir, durmir, from Latin dormīre, present active infinitive of dormiō (I sleep), from Proto-Italic *dormiō, from Proto-Indo-European *drem- (run, sleep).

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

dormir (first-person singular present indicative durmo, past participle dormido)

  1. (intransitive) to sleep; to be asleep (to rest in a state of reduced consciousness)
    Quieto! Meu gato está dormindo.Be quiet! My cat is sleeping.
  2. (intransitive) to fall asleep (to become asleep)
    Demorou horas até que eu dormisse.Hours passed before I fell asleep.
  3. (transitive) to have a given type of sleep
    Dormir uma soneca.To have a nap.
  4. (figuratively, intransitive) to sleep (to be temporarily inactive)
    A célula dos terroristas está dormindo.The terrorist cell is asleep.
  5. (euphemistic, transitive with com) to sleep with (to have sex with)
    Peguei-a dormindo com um rapaz.I caught her sleeping with a boy.
  6. (figuratively, transitive with com) to be constantly with
    A memória da guerra dorme com o veterano.The memory of the war sleeps with the veteran.
  7. (poetic, intransitive) to be dead
    Todos meus heróis dormem.All my heroes are dead.
  8. (informal, of a limb, intransitive) to fall asleep (to temporarily lose blood circulation)
    Acordei no meio da noite e meu braço tinha dormido.I woke up in the middle of the night and my arm had fallen asleep.
  9. (Brazil, slang, intransitive) not to notice a problem
    O controlador dormiu e os aviões bateram.The controller didn’t pay attention and the aeroplanes collided.

Conjugation[edit]

Quotations[edit]

For quotations of use of this term, see Citations:dormir.

Related terms[edit]


Spanish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Spanish, from Latin dormīre, present active infinitive of dormiō (I sleep), from Proto-Italic *dormiō, from Proto-Indo-European *drem- (run, sleep).

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /dorˈmiɾ/, [d̪orˈmiɾ]

Verb[edit]

dormir (first-person singular present duermo, first-person singular preterite dormí, past participle dormido)

  1. (intransitive) to sleep
  2. (reflexive) to fall asleep
  3. (euphemistic) to die; to rest in death

Conjugation[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Related terms[edit]

Further reading[edit]


Venetian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin dormīre, present active infinitive of dormiō (I sleep). Compare Italian dormire

Verb[edit]

dormir

  1. (intransitive) to sleep
    Synonyms: momir, polegiar

Conjugation[edit]

  • Venetian conjugation varies from one region to another. Hence, the following conjugation should be considered as typical, not as exhaustive.

Related terms[edit]