dormir

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Asturian[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin dormīre, present active infinitive of dormiō.

Verb[edit]

dormir

  1. to sleep

Conjugation[edit]

This verb needs an inflection-table template.


Catalan[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Provençal dormir, from Latin dormīre, present active infinitive of dormiō, from Proto-Italic *dormiō, from Proto-Indo-European *drem-(run, sleep).

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

dormir ‎(first-person singular present dormo, past participle dormit)

  1. to sleep

Conjugation[edit]

Related terms[edit]

References[edit]


French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle French dormir, from Old French dormir, from Latin dormīre, present active infinitive of dormiō(I sleep), from Proto-Italic *dormiō, from Proto-Indo-European *drem-(run, sleep).

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

dormir

  1. (intransitive) to sleep

Conjugation[edit]

This is one of a fairly large group of irregular -ir verbs that are all conjugated the same way. Other members of this group include sortir and servir. The most significant difference between these verbs' conjugation and that of the regular -ir verbs is that these verbs' conjugation does not use the infix -iss-. Further, this conjugation has the forms (je, tu) dors and (il) dort in the present indicative and imperative, whereas a regular -ir verb would have *dormis and *dormit (as in the past historic).

Related terms[edit]

See also[edit]

External links[edit]


Interlingua[edit]

Verb[edit]

dormir

  1. to sleep

Conjugation[edit]


Ladin[edit]

Verb[edit]

dormir

  1. to sleep

Conjugation[edit]

  • Ladin conjugation varies from one region to another. Hence, the following conjugation should be considered as typical, not as exhaustive.

Middle French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old French dormir, from Latin dormiō, dormīre.

Verb[edit]

dormir

  1. to sleep

Descendants[edit]


Occitan[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Provençal dormir, from Latin dormīre, present active infinitive of dormiō.

Verb[edit]

dormir

  1. to sleep

Conjugation[edit]


Old French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin dormīre, present active infinitive of dormiō.

Verb[edit]

dormir

  1. to sleep

Conjugation[edit]

This verb conjugates as a third-group verb. Old French conjugation varies significantly by date and by region. The following conjugation should be treated as a guide.

Descendants[edit]


Old Provençal[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin dormīre, present active infinitive of dormiō. Gallo-Romance cognate with Old French dormir.

Verb[edit]

dormir

  1. to sleep

Descendants[edit]

References[edit]


Portuguese[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Portuguese dormir, durmir, from Latin dormīre, present active infinitive of dormiō(I sleep), from Proto-Italic *dormiō, from Proto-Indo-European *drem-(run, sleep).

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

dormir ‎(first-person singular present indicative durmo, past participle dormido)

  1. (intransitive) to sleep; to be asleep (to rest in a state of reduced consciousness)
    Quieto! Meu gato está dormindo.
    Be quiet! My cat is sleeping.
  2. (intransitive) to fall asleep (to become asleep)
    Demorou horas até que eu dormisse.
    Hours passed before I fell asleep.
  3. (transitive) to have a given type of sleep
    Dormir uma soneca.
    To have a nap.
  4. (figuratively, intransitive) to sleep (to be temporarily inactive)
    A célula dos terroristas está dormindo.
    The terrorist cell is asleep.
  5. (euphemistic, transitive with com) to sleep with (to have sex with)
    Peguei-a dormindo com um rapaz.
    I caught her sleeping with a boy.
  6. (figuratively, transitive with com) to be constantly with
    A memória da guerra dorme com o veterano.
    The memory of the war sleeps with the veteran.
  7. (poetic, intransitive) to be dead
    Todos meus heróis dormem.
    All my heroes are dead.
  8. (informal, of a limb, intransitive) to fall asleep (to temporarily lose blood circulation)
    Acordei no meio da noite e meu braço tinha dormido.
    I woke up in the middle of the night and my arm had fallen asleep.
  9. (Brazil, slang, intransitive) not to notice a problem
    O controlador dormiu e os aviões bateram.
    The controller didn’t pay attention and the aeroplanes collided.

Quotations[edit]

For usage examples of this term, see Citations:dormir.

Conjugation[edit]

Related terms[edit]


Spanish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Spanish, from Latin dormīre, present active infinitive of dormiō(I sleep), from Proto-Italic *dormiō, from Proto-Indo-European *drem-(run, sleep).

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

dormir ‎(first-person singular present duermo, first-person singular preterite dormí, past participle dormido)

  1. to sleep
  2. (reflexive) to fall asleep
  3. (euphemistic) to die; to rest in death

Conjugation[edit]

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Venetian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin dormīre, present active infinitive of dormiō(I sleep). Compare Italian dormire

Verb[edit]

dormir

  1. (intransitive) to sleep

Related terms[edit]

Conjugation[edit]

  • Venetian conjugation varies from one region to another. Hence, the following conjugation should be considered as typical, not as exhaustive.

Synonyms[edit]