doze

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English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle English *dosen, from Old Norse dúsa ‎(to doze, rest, remain quiet), from Proto-Germanic *dusēną ‎(to be dizzy), from Proto-Indo-European *dʰewes-, *dʰews- ‎(to fly, whirl), from Proto-Indo-European *dʰew- ‎(to fly, shake, reek, steam, smolder). Cognate with German dösen ‎(to doze), Icelandic dúsa ‎(to doze), Swedish dialectal dusa ‎(to doze, slumber), Danish døse ‎(to doze), Old English dysiġ ‎(foolish, stupid), Scots dosnit ‎(stunned, stupefied), Icelandic dúra ‎(to nap, slumber). More at dizzy.

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

doze ‎(third-person singular simple present dozes, present participle dozing, simple past and past participle dozed)

  1. (intransitive) To sleep lightly or briefly; to nap.
    I didn’t sleep very well, but I think I may have dozed a bit.
    • L'Estrange
      If he happened to doze a little, the jolly cobbler waked him.
  2. (transitive) To make dull; to stupefy.
    • Samuel Pepys
      I was an hour [] in casting up about twenty sums, being dozed with much work.
    • South
      They left for a long time dozed and benumbed.
  3. (intransitive, slang) To bulldoze.

Translations[edit]

Noun[edit]

doze ‎(plural dozes)

  1. (countable) a light, short sleep or nap
    I felt much better after a short doze.

Synonyms[edit]

Translations[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

See also[edit]


Old French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin duodecim.

Numeral[edit]

doze

  1. twelve

Portuguese[edit]

Portuguese cardinal numbers
 <  11 12 13  > 
    Cardinal : doze
    Ordinal : décimo segundo
Portuguese Wikipedia article on doze

Etymology[edit]

From Old Portuguese doze, from Vulgar Latin *dōdeci, from Latin duodecim.

Pronunciation[edit]

Numeral[edit]

doze m, f

  1. twelve.

Noun[edit]

doze m (plural dozes)

  1. twelve.

Walloon[edit]

Numeral[edit]

doze

  1. twelve