drac

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Aromanian[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin dracō, from Ancient Greek δράκων (drákōn). Compare Megleno-Romanian and Daco-Romanian drac.

Noun[edit]

drac m (plural drats)

  1. devil

See also[edit]


Catalan[edit]

Catalan Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia ca

Etymology[edit]

From Latin dracō (compare Occitan drac, Italian and Spanish drago, Romanian drac), from Ancient Greek δράκων (drákōn). Compare also Catalan dragó, from the Latin accusative dracōnem.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

drac m (plural dracs)

  1. dragon
  2. (heraldry) dragon (stylised representation)

Related terms[edit]

References[edit]

  • “drac” in Diccionari català-valencià-balear, Antoni Maria Alcover and Francesc de Borja Moll, 1962.

French[edit]

drac de Beaucaire

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from Occitan drac, from Latin dracō. Compare the doublet dragon.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

drac m (plural dracs)

  1. (mythology) a type of mythological creature associated with the dangers of water

Further reading[edit]


Megleno-Romanian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin dracō, from Ancient Greek δράκων (drákōn). Compare Aromanian and Daco-Romanian drac.

Noun[edit]

drac m

  1. devil

Romanian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin dracō (dragon), from Ancient Greek δράκων (drákōn). Word has changed meaning from “dragon”, balaur in Romanian, to “devil” (one of the meanings in Ecclesiastical Latin was that of “Devil”, however). Compare also Catalan and Occitan drac and the derived French drac. Doublet of Romanian dragon, borrowed from French. Compare Sicilian dragu.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

drac m (plural draci)

  1. devil

Declension[edit]

Synonyms[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Related terms[edit]

Descendants[edit]

  • English: Dracula