dryw

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Welsh[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Usage notes[edit]

Despite being written with a "y", the vowel here is generally pronounced /ɪ/ in the north as tends to be the case when "y" precedes "w".

Etymology 1[edit]

Possibly ultimately from Proto-Indo-European *dʰerh₃- (to leap, spring forth); see Scottish Gaelic dàir. For similar sense development, compare Ancient Greek τροχίλος (trokhílos, Egyptian plover) from τρέχω (trékhō, to run).[1][2]

Cognate with Old Irish dreän (wren) and possibly Proto-Germanic *wrandijô (modern English wren).

Dryw

Noun[edit]

dryw m or f by sense (plural drywod)

  1. wren, jenny wren (Troglodytes troglodytes)[3]
    Synonyms: dryw bach, chwynnwr, powlin bach, pompen
Mutation[edit]
Welsh mutation
radical soft nasal aspirate
dryw ddryw nryw unchanged
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.
Derived terms[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

From Middle Welsh dryw, from Proto-Brythonic *drüw, from Proto-Celtic *druwits, possibly from Proto-Indo-European *dóru (tree) + *weyd- (to see, to know), hence meaning "tree-knower".

Noun[edit]

dryw m (plural drywon)

  1. druid, seer
Mutation[edit]
Welsh mutation
radical soft nasal aspirate
dryw ddryw nryw unchanged
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

Etymology 3[edit]

Noun[edit]

dryw m

  1. Soft mutation of tryw.
Mutation[edit]
Welsh mutation
radical soft nasal aspirate
tryw dryw nhryw thryw
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

References[edit]

  1. ^ R. J. Thomas, G. A. Bevan, P. J. Donovan, A. Hawke et al., editors (1950–present), “dryw”, in Geiriadur Prifysgol Cymru Online (in Welsh), University of Wales Centre for Advanced Welsh & Celtic Studies
  2. ^ MacBain, Alexander; Mackay, Eneas (1911), “dryw”, in An Etymological Dictionary of the Gaelic Language, Stirling, →ISBN, page dàir.
  3. ^ Peter Hayman; Rob Hume (2004), Iolo Williams, transl., Llyfr Adar Iolo Williams: Cymru ac Ewrop (in Welsh), Llanrwst: Gwasg Carreg Gwalch, →ISBN, page 183