duplex

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See also: Duplex and dúplex

English[edit]

English Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia

Etymology[edit]

PIE word
*dwóh₁

Borrowed from Latin duplex (double, two-fold), from duo (two) + plico (fold together); compare πλέκω (plékō, twist, braid). Analyzable as duo- +‎ -plex.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • (US) enPR: do͞o'plĕks, IPA(key): /ˈduplɛks/
  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -uplɛks

Adjective[edit]

duplex (not comparable)

  1. Double, made up of two parts.
    1. (architecture) Having two floors
    2. (architecture) Having two units, divisions, suites, apartments
  2. (telecommunications) Bidirectional (in two directions).
    duplex telegraphy
  3. (soil science) Having horizons with contrasting textures.
    • 1977, Australian Journal of Botany (volume 25, page 462)
      Soils are duplex, sandy and solodic. The dominant trees are the stringybark eucalypts []

Antonyms[edit]

  • (bidirectional): simplex (unidirectional)

Hyponyms[edit]

(bidirectional):

Derived terms[edit]

Related terms[edit]

Translations[edit]

Noun[edit]

A duplex in Bowling Green, Ohio, USA

duplex (plural duplexes)

  1. (US, Canada) A house made up of two dwelling units.
    • 2020, Akwaeke Emezi, The Death of Vivek Oji, Faber & Faber Ltd, page 53:
      The house had been renovated into a duplex and he’d put in a phone line.
  2. (US) A dwelling unit with two floors
  3. (philately) A cancellation combining a numerical cancellation with a second mark showing time, date, and place of posting.
  4. (juggling) A throwing motion where two balls are thrown with one hand at the same time.
  5. (biochemistry) A double-stranded polynucleotide.
  6. (geology) A system of multiple thrust faults bounded above and below by a roof thrust and floor thrust.
    • 1993, David J. Lidke, Jack Burton Epstein, Chester A. Wallace, U.S. Geological Survey Bulletin (page 16)
      In contrast, the folds in the overlying lithotectonic unit 4 are larger and are cut by a series of faults in a duplex.
    • 1995, Robert D. Hatcher, Structural Geology: Principles, Concepts, and Problems (page 211)
      It has been noted, using a combination of surface geologic and seismic reflection data, that a duplex, although formed in response to movement of a thrust sheet, frequently arches the thrust sheet as the duplex is built by duplication of rocks beneath it []

Related terms[edit]

Translations[edit]

See also[edit]

Verb[edit]

duplex (third-person singular simple present duplexes, present participle duplexing, simple past and past participle duplexed)

  1. To make duplex.
  2. To make into a duplex.
  3. (juggling) To make a series of duplex throws.

Related terms[edit]


French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from Latin duplex, see above.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

duplex m (plural duplex)

  1. a link between two points, such as a cable or a wire
  2. duplex, maisonette (dwelling)

Derived terms[edit]

Further reading[edit]


Italian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from Latin duplex.

Noun[edit]

duplex m (invariable)

  1. party line

Latin[edit]

Latin numbers (edit)
[a], [b] ←  1 II
2
3  → [a], [b]
    Cardinal: duo
    Ordinal: secundus
    Adverbial: bis
    Multiplier: duplex, duplus
    Distributive: bīnī
    Fractional: dīmidius, sēmis

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Italic *dwipleks, formed from duo (two) and plec-, from the root of plicō (fold); cf. also plectō, plexum.

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

duplex (genitive duplicis, adverb dupliciter); third-declension one-termination adjective

  1. twofold, double
  2. bipartite, cloven
  3. ambiguous

Declension[edit]

Third-declension one-termination adjective.

Number Singular Plural
Case / Gender Masc./Fem. Neuter Masc./Fem. Neuter
Nominative duplex duplicēs duplicia
Genitive duplicis duplicium
Dative duplicī duplicibus
Accusative duplicem duplex duplicēs duplicia
Ablative duplicī duplicibus
Vocative duplex duplicēs duplicia
  • Sg.Abl. sometimes duplice.

Descendants[edit]

  • Galician: dobre (possibly)
  • Spanish: doble (possibly)
  • English: duplex
  • French: duplex
  • Italian: duplice, duplex
  • Spanish: dúplex

References[edit]

  • duplex”, in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • duplex”, in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • duplex in Charles du Fresne du Cange’s Glossarium Mediæ et Infimæ Latinitatis (augmented edition with additions by D. P. Carpenterius, Adelungius and others, edited by Léopold Favre, 1883–1887)
  • duplex in Gaffiot, Félix (1934) Dictionnaire illustré latin-français, Hachette
  • Carl Meißner; Henry William Auden (1894) Latin Phrase-Book[1], London: Macmillan and Co.
    • a twofold tradition prevails on this subject: duplex est memoria de aliqua re
    • in two, three columns: agmine duplici, triplici

Romanian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From French duplex.

Noun[edit]

duplex n (plural duplexuri)

  1. duplex

Declension[edit]