each

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English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle English eche, from Old English ǣlċ, contraction of ǣġhwylċ (each, every, any, all), from Proto-Germanic *aiwô (ever, always) + *ga- + *hwilīkaz. Compare Scots ilk, elk (each, every), Saterland Frisian älk (each), West Frisian elk, elts (each), Dutch elk (each), Low German elk, ellik (each), German Low German elk, elke (each, every), German jeglich (any).

Pronunciation[edit]

  • (UK) IPA(key): /iːt͡ʃ/
  • (US) IPA(key): /it͡ʃ/
  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -iːtʃ

Determiner[edit]

each

  1. All; every; qualifying a singular noun, indicating all examples of the thing so named seen as individual or separate items (compare every).
    • 2013 July 19, Ian Sample, “Irregular bedtimes may affect children's brains”, in The Guardian Weekly, volume 189, number 6, page 34:
      Irregular bedtimes may disrupt healthy brain development in young children, according to a study of intelligence and sleeping habits.  ¶ Going to bed at a different time each night affected girls more than boys, but both fared worse on mental tasks than children who had a set bedtime, researchers found.
    Make sure you wash each bowl well.
    The sun comes up each morning and sets each night.

Usage notes[edit]

  • (all, every): The phrase beginning with each identifies a set of items wherein the words following each identify the individual elements by their shared characteristics. The phrase is grammatically singular in number, so if the phrase is the subject of a sentence, its verb is conjugated into a third-person singular form. Similarly, any pronouns that refer to the noun phrase are singular:
    Each candidate has 49 votes.
    Each voter must decide for herself.

Related terms[edit]

Translations[edit]

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout § Translations.

Adverb[edit]

each (not comparable)

  1. For one; apiece; per.
    The apples cost 50 cents each.

Translations[edit]

Pronoun[edit]

each

  1. Every one; every thing.
    I'm going to give each of you a chance to win.
    From each according to his ability, to each according to his needs.

Noun[edit]

each (plural eaches)

  1. (operations, philosophy) An individual item: the least quantitative unit in a grouping.
    • 1999, Paasche; Kerker, Thomas D., System and method for managing recurring orders in a computer network, US Patent 7359871 (PDF version), page 50:
      In one embodiment, there is an additional charge when ordering products as an “each” compared to the unit cost of the item when ordered by the case.
    • 2007, Mulcahy, David E., Eaches or Pieces Order Fulfillment, Design, and Operations Handbook (Series on resource management), Auerbach Publications, →ISBN, page 385:
      An each, piece, single item, or individual item package.
    • 2012, Hill, Arthur V., “unit of measure”, in The Encyclopedia of Operations Management, FT Press, →ISBN, page 373:
      The commonly used term “each” means that each individual item is one unit.
    • 2008, Neuhouser, Frederick, Rousseau's theodicy of self-love, Oxford University Press, →ISBN, page 238:
      Amour-propre would be able to take an interest in assuming the standpoint of reason, then, if applying 'each' to oneself in rational deliberation were simultaneously bound up with publicly establishing oneself as an 'each'

Anagrams[edit]


Irish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Irish ech, from Proto-Celtic *ekʷos, from Proto-Indo-European *h₁éḱwos (horse).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

each m (genitive singular eich, nominative plural eacha)

  1. (archaic) horse

Declension[edit]

Synonyms[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Mutation[edit]

Irish mutation
Radical Eclipsis with h-prothesis with t-prothesis
each n-each heach t-each
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

References[edit]


Scottish Gaelic[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Irish ech, from Proto-Celtic *ekʷos, from Proto-Indo-European *h₁éḱwos (horse).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

each m (genitive singular eich, plural eich)

  1. horse
  2. (dated) brute

Derived terms[edit]

References[edit]

  • each” in Edward Dwelly, Faclair Gàidhlig gu Beurla le Dealbhan/The Illustrated [Scottish] Gaelic–English Dictionary, 10th edition, Edinburgh: Birlinn Limited, 1911, →ISBN.
  • Gregory Toner, Maire Ní Mhaonaigh, Sharon Arbuthnot, Dagmar Wodtko, Maire-Luise Theuerkauf, editors (2019) , “ech”, in eDIL: Electronic Dictionary of the Irish Language

West Frisian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Frisian āge, from Proto-Germanic *augô, ultimately from Proto-Indo-European *h₃ekʷ- (eye; to see).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

each c (plural eagen, diminutive eachje)

  1. eye

Further reading[edit]

  • each (I)”, in Wurdboek fan de Fryske taal (in Dutch), 2011