eat, drink and be merry for tomorrow we die

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English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

A conflation of two Biblical references:

  • Then I commended mirth, because a man hath no better thing under the sun, than to eat, and to drink, and to be merry[1]
  • Let us eat and drink, for tomorrow we [shall] die[2][3]

A direct quote from the Book of Mormon:

  • Yea, and there shall be many which shall say: Eat, drink, and be merry, for tomorrow we die; and it shall be well with us.[4]

Proverb[edit]

eat, drink and be merry for tomorrow we die

  1. Life is short, so you should enjoy it while you can.
    • 1977, Bartlett Jere Whiting, Early American Proverbs and Proverbial Phrases, →ISBN, page 127:
      But are more inclined to take for their guide the maxim of "a penny saved is a penny got" than that of "let us eat drink and be merry for tomorrow we die."
    • 1996, “Tripping Billies”, in Remember Two Things, performed by Dave Matthews Band:
      Eat, drink, and be merry / For tomorrow, we'll die / Cause we're tripping billies
    • 2011, Mack Reynolds, Tomorrow Might Be Different, →ISBN:
      Vovo said, only half arguing, "Who can you point out that ever profited by this moderation teaching? Who inhistory every got anywhere practicing moderation. Some say you must live to the hilt. Eat, drink and be merry, for tomorrow we die.”
    • 2013, Carvel Collins, Fighting With Purpose: I'm in It to Win It, →ISBN, page 106:
      The younger decided to leave and live the fast life and be carefree—eat, drink, and be merry, for tomorrow we die.
  2. In speaking pejoratively of epicurean beliefs.
    • 1815, Thomas Scott, The Holy Bible, containing the Old and New Testaments : with original notes, practical observation, and copious marginal references[1], page 35:
      Instead of saying as the epicure, "let us eat drink and be merry for tomorrow we die;" or on the other hand, murmuring against the appointments of God, and indulging our vain objections; let us seek for a lively hope, a submissive will, and a contented mind
    • 1830, Joseph Smith Jr., chapter 28, in The Book of Mormon[2], 2 Nephi:
      Yea, and there shall be many which shall say: Eat, drink, and be merry, for tomorrow we die; and it shall be well with us. And there shall also be many which shall say: Eat, drink, and be merry; nevertheless, fear God—he will justify in committing a little sin; yea, lie a little, take the advantage of one because of his words, dig a pit for thy neighbor; there is no harm in this; and do all these things, for tomorrow we die; and if it so be that we are guilty, God will beat us with a few stripes, and at last we shall be saved in the kingdom of God.

References[edit]