ebur

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Latin[edit]

ebur Bȳzantīnum (a Byzantine ivory)

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Loan word, probably from Demotic yb (ivory, Elephantine), from Egyptian
AbbwE26
(ꜣbw, ivory, elephant, Elephantine). Compare Coptic ⲓⲏⲃ (iēb, Elephantine); also note Sanskrit इभ (íbha) and Tigre [script needed] (ʔabot).

In any case, probably cognate with the second half of Ancient Greek ἐλέφας (eléphas, elephant)

Pronunciation[edit]

  • (Classical) IPA(key): /ˈe.bur/, [ˈɛ.bʊr]
  • (file)

Noun[edit]

ebur n (genitive eboris); third declension

  1. ivory (material)
  2. a thing made of ivory.
  3. (figuratively) an elephant

Declension[edit]

Third-declension noun (neuter, imparisyllabic non-i-stem).

Case Singular Plural
Nominative ebur ebora
Genitive eboris eborum
Dative eborī eboribus
Accusative ebur ebora
Ablative ebore eboribus
Vocative ebur ebora

Synonyms[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Descendants[edit]

  • English: ivory
  • French: ivoire
  • Italian: avorio
  • Old Irish: ebur
  • Romanian: ivoriu
  • Spanish: ébore

References[edit]

  • ĕbur in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • ebur in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • ĕbŭr in Gaffiot, Félix (1934) Dictionnaire Illustré Latin-Français, Hachette, page 568/3
  • ebur in Harry Thurston Peck, editor (1898) Harper's Dictionary of Classical Antiquities, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • ebur in William Smith et al., editor (1890) A Dictionary of Greek and Roman Antiquities, London: William Wayte. G. E. Marindin
  • ebur” on pages 583–4 of the Oxford Latin Dictionary (1st ed., 1968–82)

Meriam[edit]

Noun[edit]

ebur

  1. bird

Old High German[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Germanic *eburaz. Cognates include Old English eofor, Old Norse jǫfurr.

Noun[edit]

ebur m

  1. boar

Declension[edit]

Descendants[edit]