eerie

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English[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle English eri (fearful), from Old English earg (cowardly, fearful), from Proto-Germanic *argaz. Akin to Scots ergh, argh from the same Old English source. Doublet of argh.

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

eerie (comparative eerier, superlative eeriest)

  1. Strange, weird, fear-inspiring, especially in a shadowy or mysterious way.
    Synonyms: creepy, spooky
    The eerie sounds seemed to come from the graveyard after midnight.
  2. (Scotland) Frightened, timid.
    • 1883, George MacDonald, Donal Grant:
      She began to feel eerie.
    • 1902, John Buchan, The Outgoing of the Tide
      'It is my business to read the hearts o' men,' said the other.
      'And who may ye be?' said Heriotside, growing eerie.

Synonyms[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Translations[edit]

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