end

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See also: End, -end, and end-

English[edit]

English Wikipedia has an article on:
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Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle English ende, from Old English ende, from Proto-West Germanic *andī, from Proto-Germanic *andijaz, from Proto-Indo-European *h₂entíos, from *h₂entíos (front, forehead).

See also Dutch einde, German Ende, Norwegian ende, Swedish ände; also Old Irish ét (end, point), Latin antiae (forelock), Albanian anë (side), Ancient Greek ἀντίος (antíos, opposite), Sanskrit अन्त्य (antya, last). More at and and anti-.

The verb is from Middle English enden, endien, from Old English endian (to end, to make an end of, complete, finish, abolish, destroy, come to an end, die), from Proto-Germanic *andijōną (to finish, end), denominative from *andijaz.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • enPR: ĕnd, IPA(key): /ɛnd/
  • (dialectal, obsolete) enPR: ēnd, IPA(key): /iːnd/[1]
  • (file)
  • (file)
  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -ɛnd

Noun[edit]

end (plural ends)

  1. The terminal point of something in space or time.
    • 1908 October, Kenneth Grahame, The Wind in the Willows, New York, N.Y.: Charles Scribner’s Sons, OCLC 305520:
      they followed him... into a sort of a central hall; out of which they could dimly see other long tunnel-like passages branching, passages mysterious and without apparent end.
    • 1913, Joseph C. Lincoln, chapter 4, in Mr. Pratt's Patients:
      I told him about everything I could think of; and what I couldn't think of he did. He asked about six questions during my yarn, but every question had a point to it. At the end he bowed and thanked me once more. As a thanker he was main-truck high; I never see anybody so polite.
    At the end of the road, turn left.
    At the end of the story, the main characters fall in love.
  2. (by extension) The cessation of an effort, activity, state, or motion.
    Is there no end to this madness?
  3. (by extension) Death.
    He met a terrible end in the jungle.
    I hope the end comes quickly.
  4. The most extreme point of an object, especially one that is longer than it is wide.
    Hold the string at both ends.
    My father always sat at the end of the table nearest the kitchen.
  5. Result.
    • 1599 (first performance), William Shakespeare, “The Tragedie of Iulius Cæsar”, in Mr. William Shakespeares Comedies, Histories, & Tragedies [] (First Folio), London: [] Isaac Iaggard, and Ed[ward] Blount, published 1623, OCLC 606515358, [Act V, (please specify the scene number in lowercase Roman numerals)]:
      O that a man might know / The end of this day's business ere it come!
    • 1876, Great Britain. Public Record Office, John Sherren Brewer, Robert Henry Brodie, James Gairdner, Letters and Papers, Foreign and Domestic, of the Reign of Henry VIII (volume 4, issue 3, part 2, page 3154)
      The end was that he was thought an archfool.
  6. A purpose, goal, or aim.
    For what end should I toil?
    The end of our club is to advance conversation and friendship.
    Synonym: purpose
    • 1675, John Dryden, Aureng-zebe: A Tragedy. [], London: [] T[homas] N[ewcomb] for Henry Herringman, [], published 1676, OCLC 228724395, Act III:
      But, losing her, the End of Living lose.
    • 1825, Samuel Taylor Coleridge, Aids to Reflection in the Formation of a Manly Character, Aphorism VI, page 146:
      When every man is his own end, all things will come to a bad end.
    • 1946, Bertrand Russell, History of Western Philosophy, I.21:
      There is a long argument to prove that foreign conquest is not the end of the State, showing that many people took the imperialist view.
  7. (cricket) One of the two parts of the ground used as a descriptive name for half of the ground.
    The Pavillion End
  8. (American football) The position at the end of either the offensive or defensive line, a tight end, a split end, a defensive end.
  9. (curling) A period of play in which each team throws eight rocks, two per player, in alternating fashion.
  10. (mathematics) An ideal point of a graph or other complex. See End (graph theory)
  11. That which is left; a remnant; a fragment; a scrap.
  12. One of the yarns of the worsted warp in a Brussels carpet.
  13. (in the plural, slang, African-American Vernacular) Money.
    Don't give them your ends. You jack that shit!

Usage notes[edit]

  • Adjectives often used with "end": final, ultimate, deep, happy, etc.

Synonyms[edit]

Antonyms[edit]

Hyponyms[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Related terms[edit]

Descendants[edit]

  • Japanese: エンド

Translations[edit]

Verb[edit]

end (third-person singular simple present ends, present participle ending, simple past and past participle ended)

  1. (intransitive, ergative) to come to an end
    Is this movie never going to end?
    The lesson will end when the bell rings.
  2. (transitive) To finish, terminate.
    The referee blew the whistle to end the game.

Conjugation[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Translations[edit]

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout § Translations.

References[edit]

  1. ^ Bingham, Caleb (1808), “Improprieties in Pronunciation, common among the people of New-England”, in The Child's Companion; Being a Conciſe Spelling-book [] [1], 12th edition, Boston: Manning & Loring, OCLC 671561968, page 75.

Anagrams[edit]


Albanian[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Proto-Albanian *antis/t, from Proto-Indo-European *h₂n̥t-jes/t (to plait, weave).[1]

Verb[edit]

end (first-person singular past tense enda, participle endur)

  1. (transitive) to weave
    Synonyms: vej, vegjoj
Derived terms[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

Ultimately from Proto-Indo-European *h₂endʰ-.

Verb[edit]

end (first-person singular past tense enda, participle endur)

  1. (intransitive) to bloom, blossom
  2. (transitive) to flyblow
Derived terms[edit]
Related terms[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Demiraj, Bardhyl (1997) Albanische Etymologien: Untersuchungen zum albanischen Erbwortschatz [Albanian Etymologies: Investigations into the Albanian Inherited Lexicon] (Leiden Studies in Indo-European; 7)‎[2] (in German), Amsterdam, Atlanta: Rodopi, page 166

Danish[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Old Norse enn, probably from Proto-Germanic *þan (then), like English than, German denn (than, for). For the loss of þ-, compare Old Norse at (that) from Proto-Germanic *þat (that).

Pronunciation[edit]

Conjunction[edit]

end

  1. than (in comparisons)
    Han er venligere end hende.
    He is friendlier than her.
    Han er venligere end hun er.
    He is friendlier than she is.

Etymology 2[edit]

From Old Norse enn, from Proto-Germanic *andi, from Proto-Indo-European *h₂entí.

Pronunciation[edit]

Adverb[edit]

end

  1. still (archaic)
    Thi end bestandig gælder de gamle, gyldne ord.
    For the old, golden words are still continually valid.
  2. (with interrogatives) no matter, ever
    Hvor man end er, kan man føle sig alene.
    Wherever you are, you may feel alone.
  3. even (in the modern language only in the combination end ikke "not even")
    End ikke statsministeren kan nå alt.
    Not even the primeminister can get everything done.

Etymology 3[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

end

  1. imperative of ende

Dutch[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle Dutch ende (end) with apocope of the final -e.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

end n (plural enden, diminutive endje n)

  1. end
  2. travel distance
    • 1955, Remco Campert, “Vijfhonderd zilverlingen”, in Alle dagen feest, De Bezige Bij:
      De enige bij wie ik nog niet geweest ben, is Alain en die woont in het Quartier Latin en dat is een heel end weg.
      The only one I haven't visited yet is Alain as he lives in the Latin Quarter which is a long way off.
  3. a short length of something (such as a stick or a rope)

Usage notes[edit]

The form end is more informal than both einde and eind and is mainly used colloquially.

Synonyms[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Estonian[edit]

Pronoun[edit]

end

  1. partitive singular of ise

Middle English[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Old English ende.

Noun[edit]

end

  1. Alternative form of ende

Etymology 2[edit]

From Old English endian.

Verb[edit]

end

  1. Alternative form of enden

Norwegian Bokmål[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

end

  1. imperative of ende

Anagrams[edit]


Norwegian Nynorsk[edit]

Verb[edit]

end

  1. imperative of enda

Vilamovian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle High German ende, from Old High German enti.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

end n

  1. end

Antonyms[edit]