ex

Definition from Wiktionary, the free dictionary
Jump to: navigation, search
See also: Ex, ex., ex-, and -ex

English[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

ex ‎(plural exes)

  1. The name of the Latin-script letter X/x.
  2. (colloquial) An ex-husband, ex-wife or ex-partner.
    She broke up with her ex.

See also[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Translations[edit]

Verb[edit]

ex ‎(third-person singular simple present exes, present participle exing, simple past and past participle exed)

  1. To delete; to cross out

Statistics[edit]

Most common English words before 1923: easily · condition · sleep · #687: ex · mere · agreement · ship

Anagrams[edit]


German[edit]

Verb[edit]

ex

  1. Imperative singular of exen.
  2. (colloquial) First-person singular present of exen.

Hungarian[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): [ˈɛks]
  • Hyphenation: ex

Noun[edit]

ex ‎(plural exek)

  1. (colloquial) ex (ex-husband, ex-wife or ex-partner)

Declension[edit]

Inflection (stem in -e-, front unrounded harmony)
singular plural
nominative ex exek
accusative exet exeket
dative exnek exeknek
instrumental exszel exekkel
causal-final exért exekért
translative exszé exekké
terminative exig exekig
essive-formal exként exekként
essive-modal
inessive exben exekben
superessive exen exeken
adessive exnél exeknél
illative exbe exekbe
sublative exre exekre
allative exhez exekhez
elative exből exekből
delative exről exekről
ablative extől exektől
Possessive forms of ex
possessor single possession multiple possessions
1st person sing. exem exeim
2nd person sing. exed exeid
3rd person sing. exe exei
1st person plural exünk exeink
2nd person plural exetek exeitek
3rd person plural exük exeik

Icelandic[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

ex n ‎(genitive singular ex, nominative plural ex)

  1. The name of the Latin-script letter X/x.

Declension[edit]


Italian[edit]

Noun[edit]

ex m, f ‎(invariable)

  1. ex (ex-boyfriend, girlfriend)

Latin[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

EB1911 - Volume 01 - Page 001 - 1.svg This entry lacks etymological information. If you are familiar with the origin of this term, please add it to the page per etymology instructions.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

ex ‎(indeclinable)

  1. A name of the letter X.
Usage notes[edit]
  • Multiple Latin names for the letter X, x have been suggested. The most common are ix or īx, ex, or a syllabic x, although there is some evidence which also supports such names for the letter as and .
Synonyms[edit]
  • (name of the letter X): ix, īx
Coordinate terms[edit]

References[edit]

  • Arthur E. Gordon, The Letter Names of the Latin Alphabet (University of California Press, 1973; volume 9 of University of California Publications: Classical Studies), especially pages 30–31, 42–44, and 63

Etymology 2[edit]

From Proto-Indo-European *h₁eǵʰs ‎(out). Cognates include Ancient Greek ἐξ ‎(ex) or ἐκ ‎(ek), Old Irish ess-, a, ass, Lithuanian ìš and Old Church Slavonic из ‎(iz).

Alternative forms[edit]

as prefix:
  • (before vowels, c-, qu-, t-, s-, and p- except for epascere and epotare): ex-
  • (before b-, d-, g-, l-, m-, n-, r-, i-, u) ē-
  • (before f, usually assimilated to ef-): ec-

Pronunciation[edit]

Preposition[edit]

ex

  1. (with ablative) out of, from
Usage notes[edit]
  • Sometimes shortened as ē. In cases where the proceeding ablative noun begins with a vowel or h, only ēx can be used. Besides that, there are no rules for when ē or ēx can be used.
Derived terms[edit]
Related terms[edit]
Descendants[edit]
  • English: ex-
  • Portuguese: eis

References[edit]

  • ex” in Charlton T. Lewis & Charles Short, A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1879.
  • ex” in Félix Gaffiot (1934), Dictionnaire Illustré Latin-Français, Paris: Hachette.
  • Meissner, Carl; Auden, Henry William (1894) Latin Phrase-Book[1], London: Macmillan and Co.
    • to stand out of the water: ex aqua exstare
    • to come to the surface: (se) ex aqua emergere
    • to draw off water from a river: aquam ex flumine derivare
    • the Rhine rises in the Alps: Rhenus oritur or profluit ex Alpibus
    • the tide is coming in: aestus ex alto se incitat (B. G. 3.12)
    • to evacuate territory: (ex) finibus excedere
    • to return from a journey: ex itinere redire
    • to leave a place: discedere a, de, ex loco aliquo
    • to leave a place: egredi loco; excedere ex loco
    • to quit a place for ever: decedere loco, de, ex loco
    • to dismount: descendere ex equo
    • the Nile rushes down from very high mountains: Nilus praecipitat ex altissimis montibus
    • to rush out of the house: se proripere ex domo
    • since the time that, since (at the beginning of a sentence): ex quo tempore or simply ex quo
    • to wrest from a person's hand: ex or de manibus alicui or alicuius extorquere aliquid
    • to go out of sight, disappear: abire ex oculis, e conspectu alicuius
    • a native of England: ortus ab Anglis or oriundus ex Anglis
    • to leave one's boyhood behind one, become a man: ex pueris excedere
    • to have the gout: ex pedibus laborare, pedibus aegrum esse
    • to recover from a disease: ex morbo convalescere (not reconvalescere)
    • to sleep soundly (from fatigue): arte, graviter dormire (ex lassitudine)
    • to depart this life: (ex) vita excedere, ex vita abire
    • to depart this life: de vita exire, de (ex) vita migrare
    • concatenation, interdependence of causes: rerum causae aliae ex aliis nexae
    • important results are often produced by trivial causes: ex parvis saepe magnarum rerum momenta pendent
    • to originate in, arise from: ex aliqua re nasci, manare
    • to accrue in great abundance: ex aliqua re redundare (in or ad aliquid)
    • untold advantages arise from a thing: utilitas efflorescit ex aliqua re
    • these things have the same origin: haec ex eodem fonte fluunt, manant
    • from every point of view; looked at in every light: omni ex parte; in omni genere; omnibus rebus
    • to a certain extent: aliqua ex parte
    • to depend upon a thing: pendēre ex aliqua re
    • to be composed of; to consist of: constare ex aliqua re
    • it is evident from..: cernitur (in) aliqua re (not ex aliqua re)
    • to let success slip through one's fingers: fortunam ex manibus dimittere
    • his crowning happiness is produced by a thing; the culminating point of his felicity is..: ad felicitatem (magnus) cumulus accedit ex aliqua re
    • to rescue from peril: aliquem ex periculo eripere, servare
    • to raise a man from poverty to wealth: aliquem ex paupere divitem facere
    • to be of use: usui or ex usu esse
    • to derive (great) profit , advantage from a thing: fructum (uberrimum) capere, percipere, consequi ex aliqua re
    • (great) advantage accrues to me from this: fructus ex hac re redundant in or ad me
    • to find favour with some one; to get into their good graces: benevolentiam, favorem, voluntatem alicuius sibi conciliare or colligere (ex aliqua re)
    • according to a man's deserts: ex, pro merito
    • as one would wish; to one's mind: ex sententia
    • I heard him say..: ex eo audivi, cum diceret
    • to derive pleasure from a thing: voluptatem ex aliqua re capere or percipere
    • to recruit oneself, seek relaxation: animum relaxare, reficere, recreare or simply se reficere, se recreare, refici, recreari (ex aliqua re)
    • to infer by comparison, judge one thing by another: coniecturam alicuius rei facere or capere ex aliqua re
    • to judge others by oneself: de se (ex se de aliis) coniecturam facere
    • to relieve a man of his scruple: scrupulum ex animo alicuius evellere (Rosc. Am. 2. 6)
    • according to my strong conviction: ex animi mei sententia (vid. sect. XI. 2)
    • to put off from one day to another: diem ex die ducere, differre
    • from memory; by heart: ex memoria (opp. de scripto)
    • the memory of this will never fade from my mind: numquam ex animo meo memoria illius rei discedet
    • a thing escapes, vanishes from the memory: aliquid excidit e memoria, effluit, excidit ex animo
    • to choose one from a large number of instances: ex infinita exemplorum copia unum (pauca) sumere, decerpere (eligere)
    • to take a lesson from some one's example: sibi exemplum sumere ex aliquo or exemplum capere de aliquo
    • systematic succession, concatenation: continuatio seriesque rerum, ut alia ex alia nexa et omnes inter se aptae colligataeque sint (N. D. 1. 4. 9)
    • to derive an argument from a thing: argumentum ducere, sumere ex aliqua re or petere ab aliqua re
    • to draw a conclusion from a thing: concludere, colligere, efficere, cogere ex aliqua re
    • it follows from this that..: sequitur (not ex quo seq.) ut
    • it follows from this that..: ex quo, unde, hinc efficitur ut
    • to speak extempore: subito, ex tempore (opp. ex praeparato) dicere
    • there is a flavour of Atticism about his discourse: ex illius orationibus ipsae Athenae redolent
    • profound sentiments: sententiae reconditae ex exquisitae (Brut. 97. 274)
    • to read a speech: de scripto orationem habere, dicere (opp. sine scripto, ex memoria)
    • to translate from Plato: ab or de (not ex) Platone vertere, convertere, transferre
    • what follows has been translated into Latin from Plato's Phaedo: ex Platonis Phaedone haec in latinum conversa sunt
    • to extract a word from some one: verbum ex aliquo elicere
    • no word escaped him: nullum verbum ex ore eius excidit (or simply ei)
    • to form, derive a word from... (used of the man who first creates the word): vocabulum, verbum, nomen ducere ab, ex...
    • to make extracts from Cicero's writings: aliquid, multa ex Ciceronis libris excerpere (not excerpere librum)
    • to take pleasure in a thing: laetitiam capere or percipere ex aliqua re
    • I am pained, vexed, sorry: doleo aliquid, aliqua re, de and ex aliqua re
    • to be vexed about a thing: dolorem capere (percipere) ex aliqua re
    • to undergo severe trouble, trials: magnum luctum haurire (without ex-)
    • to feel sorrow about a thing: luctum percipere ex aliqua re
    • to recover from one's fright: ex metu se recreare, se colligere
    • to stifle, repress all humane sentiments in one's mind: omnem humanitatem ex animo exstirpare (Amic. 13. 48)
    • to love deeply: aliquem ex animo or ex animi sententia amare (Q. Fr. 1. 1. 5)
    • to banish love from one's mind: amorem ex animo eicere
    • to banish all feeling of prejudice from the mind: suspicionem ex animo delere
    • to make a person odious, unpopular: invidiam, odium ex-, concitare alicui, in aliquem
    • to live as scrupulously moral a life as ever: nihil ex pristina virtute remittere
    • to measure something by the standard of something else; to make something one's criterion: metiri, ponderare, aestimare, iudicare aliquid (ex) aliqua re
    • to banish devout sentiment from the minds of others: religionem ex animis extrahere (N. D. 1. 43. 121)
    • I swear on my conscience: ex animi mei sententia iuro
    • sole heir; heir to three-quarters of the estate: heres ex asse, ex dodrante
    • heir to two-thirds of the property: heres ex besse
    • according to my custom: ex consuetudine mea (opp. praeter consuetudinem)
    • according to traditional usage: ex instituto (Liv. 6. 10. 6)
    • to have a large income from a thing (e.g. from mines): magnas pecunias ex aliqua re (e.g. ex metallis) facere
    • the rate of interest has gone up from 4 per cent to 8 per cent: fenus ex triente Id. Quint. factum erat bessibus (Att. 4. 15. 7)
    • to make profit out of a thing: lucrum facere (opp. damnum facere) ex aliqua re
    • to get out of debt: ex aere alieno exire
    • to depose, bring down a person from his elevated position: aliquem ex altissimo dignitatis gradu praecipitare (Dom. 37. 98)
    • to raise oneself by another's fall: crescere ex aliquo
    • to profit by the unpopularity of the senate to gain influence oneself: crescere ex invidia senatoria
    • to use some one's unpopularity as a means of making oneself popular: ex invidia alicuius auram popularem petere (Liv. 22. 26)
    • owing to political dissension: ex rei publicae dissensione
    • to banish a person, send him into exile: ex urbe (civitate) expellere, pellere aliquem
    • to expel a person from the city, country: exterminare (ex) urbe, de civitate aliquem (Mil. 37. 101)
    • to deliver the state from a tyranny: rem publicam in libertatem vindicare a or ex dominatione
    • the public income from the mines: pecunia publica, quae ex metallis redit
    • to go to law with a person: (ex) iure, lege agere cum aliquo
    • justly and equitably: ex aequo et bono (Caecin. 23. 65)
    • to make a sally, sortie from the town: eruptionem facere ex oppido
    • to make a sally, sortie from the town: crebras ex oppido excursiones facere (B. G. 2. 30)
    • to fight on horseback: ex equo pugnare
    • soldiers routed and dispersed: ex (in) fuga dissipati or dispersi (B. G. 2. 24)
    • to die of wounds: ex vulnere mori (Fam. 10. 33)
    • to triumph over some one: triumphare de aliquo (ex bellis)
    • to triumph over some one: triumphum agere de or ex aliquo or c. Gen. (victoriae, pugnae)
    • according to treaty: ex pacto, ex foedere
    • the ships sail from the harbour: naves ex portu solvunt
    • the ships sail out on a fair wind: ventum (tempestatem) nancti idoneum ex portu exeunt
    • the storm drives some one on an unknown coast: procella (tempestas) aliquem ex alto ad ignotas terras (oras) defert
    • to land, disembark: exire ex, de navi
    • much damage was done by this collision: ex eo navium concursu magnum incommodum est acceptum
    • from this it appears, is apparent: ex quo intellegitur or intellegi potest, debet
    • from this it appears, is apparent: ex quo perspicuum est
  • ex” in Ramminger, Johann (accessed 16 July 2016) Neulateinische Wortliste: Ein Wörterbuch des Lateinischen von Petrarca bis 1700[2], pre-publication website, 2005-2016
  • De Vaan, Michiel (2008) Etymological Dictionary of Latin and the other Italic Languages (Leiden Indo-European Etymological Dictionary Series; 7), Leiden, Boston: Brill, page 195f

Portuguese[edit]

Noun[edit]

ex m f (plural ex)

  1. (colloquial) ex (an ex-husband, ex-wife or ex-partner)

Spanish[edit]

Noun[edit]

ex m, f ‎(plural ex)

  1. ex (ex-husband, ex-wife or ex-partner).

Adjective[edit]

ex ‎(indeclinable)

  1. Former; referring to a condition that has ended.

Usage notes[edit]

In many cases this is interchangeable with using ex-; for example, the former governor of a province could be called the ex gobernador or the exgobernador.


Swedish[edit]

Noun[edit]

ex n

  1. (colloquial) ex; ex-partner

Declension[edit]

Inflection of ex 
Singular Plural
Indefinite Definite Indefinite Definite
Nominative ex exet ex exen
Genitive ex exets ex exens