extravert

Definition from Wiktionary, the free dictionary
Jump to navigation Jump to search

English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

As a verb, from New Latin extrāvertere, from Classical Latin extrā- (outside) + vertere (to turn). As a noun and adjective, a backformation from extraversion, q.v. Popularized in psychology by translations of German works by Carl Jung.

Noun[edit]

extravert (plural extraverts)

  1. Alternative spelling of extrovert
    • 1916, Constance Ellen Long trans. Carl Jung as Collected Papers on Analytical Psychology, p. 349:
      An Extravert can hardly conceive the necessity which compels the Introvert to conquer the world by means of a system.
Usage notes[edit]

Technical papers in psychology prefer extravert, the variant used by Carl Jung, although the spelling extrovert is more common in general use.

Adjective[edit]

extravert (comparative more extravert, superlative most extravert)

  1. Alternative spelling of extrovert
    • 1924, A.G. Ikin, The British Journal of Medical Psychology, No. 4, p. 214:
      The personality which thus combines introvert and extravert reactions... can be... called an ‘altrovert’...

Verb[edit]

extravert (third-person singular simple present extraverts, present participle extraverting, simple past and past participle extraverted)

  1. Alternative spelling of extrovert, especially (early chemistry, obsolete) so as to be visible.
    • 1669, William Simpson, Hydrologia Chymica, p. 52:
      It is not the moist air that extraverts any preexistent nitrous parts from the body of the minerals.
    • 1915, Carl Jung, "On Psychological Understanding", Journal of Abnormal Psychology, No. 9, p. 397:
      An extraverted individual can hardly understand the necessity that forces the introverted to accomplish his adaptation by first formulating a general conception.

References[edit]