far

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See also: fár, får, fær, far-, and Far

Contents

English[edit]

English Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia

Etymology 1[edit]

From Middle English ferre, fer, Old English feor, feorr, from Proto-Germanic *ferrai, from Proto-Indo-European *per- (to go over). Cognate with Middle Low German vere, Dutch ver, and German fern.

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

far (comparative farther or further, superlative farthest or furthest or farthermost or furthermost)

  1. (obsolete, Scotland, Northern England) Distant.
    A far land.
  2. Remote in space.
    He went to a far country.
  3. Remote in time.
  4. Long.
    It was a far adventure, full of danger.
  5. More remote or longer of two.
    • 1918, W. B. Maxwell, chapter 19, in The Mirror and the Lamp:
      At the far end of the houses the head gardener stood waiting for his mistress, and he gave her strips of bass to tie up her nosegay. This she did slowly and laboriously, with knuckly old fingers that shook.
    He moved to the far end of the state. She remained at this end.
  6. Extreme.
    We are on the far right on this issue.
  7. Widely different in nature or quality; opposite in character.
    • F. Anstey
      He was far from ill looking, though he thought himself still farther.
  8. (computing, not comparable) Outside the currently selected segment in a segmented memory architecture.
    far heap;  far memory; far pointer
Antonyms[edit]
Derived terms[edit]
Related terms[edit]
Translations[edit]
References[edit]

Adverb[edit]

far (comparative farther or further, superlative farthest or furthest)

  1. Distant in space, time or degree.
    My house is quite far from the beach.  The plan is good, but it is far from being flawless.
    • 1879, R[ichard] J[efferies], chapter 1, in The Amateur Poacher, London: Smith, Elder, & Co., [], OCLC 752825175, page 048:
      It was not far from the house; but the ground sank into a depression there, and the ridge of it behind shut out everything except just the roof of the tallest hayrick. As one sat on the sward behind the elm, with the back turned on the rick and nothing in front but the tall elms and the oaks in the other hedge, it was quite easy to fancy it the verge of the prairie with the backwoods close by.
  2. To or from a great distance, time, or degree.
    You have all come far and you will go farther.
  3. (with a comparative) Very much.
    He was far richer than we'd thought.
    • 2012 May 5, Phil McNulty, “Chelsea 2-1 Liverpool”, in BBC Sport:
      The Reds were on the back foot early on when a catalogue of defensive errors led to Ramires giving Chelsea the lead. Jay Spearing conceded possession in midfield and Ramires escaped Jose Enrique far too easily before scoring at the near post with a shot Reina should have saved.
Translations[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

From Latin far. Doublet of farro.

Noun[edit]

far (uncountable)

  1. Spelt (a type of wheat, Triticum spelta), especially in the context of Roman use of it.
    • 1756, Aurelius Cornelius Celsus, Medicine: In Eight Books, page 108
      A cataplasm made from any meal is heating, whether it be of wheat, or of far, or barley, or bitter vetch, ...
    • 1857, John Marius Wilson, The Rural Cyclopedia:
      Almost all the rustic writers agree in this, that far is most proper for wet clay land, and triticum for dry land. 'In wet red clays,' says Cato, 'sow far; and in dry, clean, and open lands, sow triticum.'
    • 1872, John Cordy Jeaffreson, Brides and Bridals, volume 1, page 201:
      Our wedding-cake is the memorial of a practice, that bore a striking resemblance to, if it was not derived from, confarreatio, the form of marriage that had fallen into general disuse amongst the Romans in the time of Tiberius. Taking its name from the cake of far and mola salsa that was broken over the bride's head, confarreatio was attended with an incident that increases its resemblance to the way in which our ancestors used at their weddings objects symbolical of natural plentifulness.
    • 1919, Carl Holliday, Wedding Customs Then and Now, page 32:
      The early Romans broke a cake of far and mola salsa (salted meal) over the bride's head, — a symbol of plentifulness, []
Translations[edit]

Etymology 3[edit]

Noun[edit]

far (plural fars)

  1. (Britain, dialect) A litter of piglets; a farrow.

Anagrams[edit]


Albanian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from Latin Pharus.

Noun[edit]

far m

  1. lighthouse

Catalan[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin Pharus.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

far m (plural fars)

  1. lighthouse
  2. headlight

Cimbrian[edit]

Noun[edit]

far ?

  1. fern

References[edit]

  • Umberto Patuzzi, ed., (2013) Ünsarne Börtar, Luserna: Comitato unitario delle linguistiche storiche germaniche in Italia / Einheitskomitee der historischen deutschen Sprachinseln in Italien

Dalmatian[edit]

Verb[edit]

far

  1. Alternative form of facro

Danish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Norse faðir, from Proto-Germanic *fadēr, from Proto-Indo-European *ph₂tḗr (father).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

far c (singular definite faren, plural indefinite fædre)

  1. father, dad

Inflection[edit]

Synonyms[edit]

Related terms[edit]

Further reading[edit]


Esperanto[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Back-formation from fari (to do, to make).

Preposition[edit]

far

  1. (neologism) by[1]
    La libro de Johano far Ŝekspiro
    John's book by Shakespeare)
    regado de la popolo, far la popolo, kaj por la popolo
    government of the people, by the people, and for the people
    Synonyms: de, fare de

Usage notes[edit]

Unofficial. The most common innovative preposition, far is used for some of the functions of the preposition de "of, from, by", which some authors feel is overworked. Useful to distinguish, for example, the owner of a book (de) from the author (far).

References[edit]

  1. ^ Wennergren, Bertilo (2010-03-09), “Neoficialaj rolvortetoj”, in Plena Manlibro de Esperanta Gramatiko[1] (in Esperanto), retrieved 2010-10-08

Faroese[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Norse far.

Pronunciation[edit]

Phonetik.svg This entry needs pronunciation information. If you are familiar with the IPA then please add some!

Noun[edit]

far n (genitive singular fars, plural før)

  1. drive, ride, tour
  2. vessel
  3. trace, sign

Declension[edit]

Declension of far
n5 singular plural
indefinite definite indefinite definite
nominative far farið før førini
accusative far farið før førini
dative fari farinum førum førunum
genitive fars farsins fara faranna

Derived terms[edit]


French[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

far m (plural fars)

  1. A traditional Breton cake

Further reading[edit]


Hungarian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Uralic *ponče (tail).[1] Older hypotheses have attempted to derive far from Proto-Uralic *pure- (back, rear) or Proto-Finno-Ugric *perä (back, rear).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

far (plural farok)

  1. buttock, posterior
  2. stern (ship)
  3. tail, rear (vehicle)

Declension[edit]

Inflection (stem in -o-, back harmony)
singular plural
nominative far farok
accusative fart farokat
dative farnak faroknak
instrumental farral farokkal
causal-final farért farokért
translative farrá farokká
terminative farig farokig
essive-formal farként farokként
essive-modal
inessive farban farokban
superessive faron farokon
adessive farnál faroknál
illative farba farokba
sublative farra farokra
allative farhoz farokhoz
elative farból farokból
delative farról farokról
ablative fartól faroktól
Possessive forms of far
possessor single possession multiple possessions
1st person sing. farom faraim
2nd person sing. farod faraid
3rd person sing. fara farai
1st person plural farunk faraink
2nd person plural farotok faraitok
3rd person plural faruk faraik

Derived terms[edit]

(Compound words):

References[edit]

  1. ^ Luobbal Sámmol Sámmol Ánte (Ante Aikio). 2018. "Notes on the development of some consonant clusters in Hungarian". In: Sampsa Holopainen & Janne Saarikivi (eds.), Περι ορθοτητος ετυμον. Uusiutuva uralilainen etymologia, pp. 77–90. Uralica Helsingiensia 11.

Icelandic[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

far n (genitive singular fars, nominative plural för)

  1. passage, ride
    Má ég fá far?
    Can I get a ride?
  2. imprint, trace
  3. character, personality

Declension[edit]

Synonyms[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

See also[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Italian[edit]

Verb[edit]

far

  1. Apocopic form of fare

Anagrams[edit]


Latin[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Indo-European *bʰars- (spike, prickle) (compare Welsh bara (bread), English barley, Serbo-Croatian бра̏шно, brȁšno (flour), Albanian bar (grass), Ancient Greek Φήρον (Phḗron, plant deity)).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

far n (genitive farris); third declension

  1. spelt (type of wheat) (Triticum spelta)
  2. coarse meal; grits

Inflection[edit]

Third declension neuter i-stem.

Case Singular Plural
nominative far farra
genitive farris farrium
farrum
dative farrī farribus
accusative far farra
ablative farre farribus
vocative far farra

Derived terms[edit]

Descendants[edit]


Maltese[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Arabic فَأْر (faʾr, mouse).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

far m (plural firien)

  1. mouse

Norwegian Bokmål[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Old Norse faðir, from Proto-Germanic *fadēr, from Proto-Indo-European *ph₂tḗr (father). Compare longer version fader.

Noun[edit]

far m (definite singular faren, indefinite plural fedre, definite plural fedrene)

  1. a father
Synonyms[edit]
Derived terms[edit]
Related terms[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

Verb[edit]

far

  1. imperative of fare

Norwegian Nynorsk[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Old Norse faðir, from Proto-Germanic *fadēr, from Proto-Indo-European *ph₂tḗr (father). Compare longer version fader. Akin to English father.

Noun[edit]

far m (definite singular faren, indefinite plural fedrar, definite plural fedrane)

  1. father

Synonyms[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Related terms[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

From Old Norse far.

Noun[edit]

far n (definite singular faret, indefinite plural far, definite plural fara)

  1. trace, track

Synonyms[edit]

Etymology 3[edit]

Verb[edit]

far

  1. imperative of fara

References[edit]


Occitan[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

far

  1. Alternative form of faire

Noun[edit]

far m (plural fars)

  1. (nautical) lighthouse

Old Irish[edit]

Determiner[edit]

far

  1. Alternative form of for

Old Occitan[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin facere, present active infinitive of faciō.

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

far

  1. to do
    • c. 1130, Jaufre Rudel, canso:
      Dieus que fetz tot qunt ve ni vai / E formet sest'amor de lonh / Mi don poder [...].
      God, who makes everything that comes or goes and who created this distant love, give me power.

Descendants[edit]


Old Swedish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From (eastern) Old Norse *fāʀ (Old West Norse fær), from Proto-Germanic *fahaz.

Noun[edit]

fār n

  1. sheep

Declension[edit]

Descendants[edit]


Romanian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from Latin Pharus, French phare.

Noun[edit]

far n (plural faruri)

  1. lighthouse
  2. (figuratively) beacon
  3. car headlight

Declension[edit]


Romansch[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin faciō, facere.

Verb[edit]

far

  1. (Rumantsch Grischun, Sursilvan, Sutsilvan, Surmiran, Vallader) to do, make

Conjugation[edit]


Scottish Gaelic[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

EB1911 - Volume 01 - Page 001 - 1.svg This entry lacks etymological information. If you are familiar with the origin of this term, please add it to the page per etymology instructions. You can also discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.

Conjunction[edit]

far

  1. where (relative/non-interrogative)
    Bha e cunnartach far an robh am balach ag iasgach. - It was dangerous where the boy was fishing.

Etymology 2[edit]

Preposition[edit]

far

  1. Alternative form of bhàrr

Swedish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Short for fader, from Old Norse faðir, from Proto-Germanic *fadēr, from Proto-Indo-European *ph₂tḗr (father).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

far c

  1. father

Declension[edit]

Declension of far 
Singular Plural
Indefinite Definite Indefinite Definite
Nominative far fadern fäder fäderna
Genitive fars faderns fäders fädernas

Related terms[edit]

Verb[edit]

far

  1. imperative of fara.
  2. present tense of fara.

References[edit]


Turkish[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

Borrowed from French phare.

Noun[edit]

far (definite accusative farı, plural farlar)

  1. headlight

Etymology 2[edit]

Borrowed from French fard.

Noun[edit]

far (definite accusative farı, plural farlar)

  1. eye shadow
Declension[edit]
Inflection
Nominative far
Definite accusative farı
Singular Plural
Nominative far farlar
Definite accusative farı farları
Dative fara farlara
Locative farda farlarda
Ablative fardan farlardan
Genitive farın farların
Possessive forms
Singular Plural
1st singular farım farlarım
2nd singular farın farların
3rd singular farı farları
1st plural farımız farlarımız
2nd plural farınız farlarınız
3rd plural farları farları
Synonyms[edit]

Venetian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin facere (compare Italian fare), present active infinitive of faciō.

Verb[edit]

far

  1. (transitive) to do
  2. (transitive) to make
  3. (transitive) to act, operate
  4. (transitive) to study


Volapük[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

far (plural fars)

  1. lighthouse

Declension[edit]

See also[edit]


Westrobothnian[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Old Norse faðir, feðr, -faðr, -fǫðr, from Proto-Germanic *fadēr, from Proto-Indo-European *ph₂tḗr (father).

Alternative forms[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /fɑːr/, /faːr/, /fæːr/, /feːr/

Noun[edit]

far m (definite farin or far’n, vocative fare)

  1. father
    Han fekk säg ä bra tag, då’n einsamen ärvd farin
    He got a good advantage when he alone inherited the father.
    Hä var grannars far’n dill å håll prästa i år men han hadd int’ na dill å påhåll.
    It was the father of the house in the neighbouring farm's turn to be priest-host (during house hearings) this year, but he lacked what was required.
Synonyms[edit]
Derived terms[edit]
Related terms[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

From Old Norse for, from Proto-Germanic *furhs.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /fɑːr/, /fɒːr/, /fɔːr/

Noun[edit]

far f (definite fara, plural fara, definite plural farana)

  1. furrow
Alternative forms[edit]
Derived terms[edit]

Etymology 3[edit]

Noun[edit]

far n

  1. Alternative form of fær

Etymology 4[edit]

From Old Norse fær, *fāʀ, from Proto-Germanic *fahaz, from Proto-Indo-European *póḱos.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): [fóːɾ], [fɒ́ːɾ], [fɑ́ːɾ]

Noun[edit]

far n

  1. Sheep.
Synonyms[edit]

Etymology 5[edit]

Verb[edit]

far

  1. Alternative form of fær