fido

Definition from Wiktionary, the free dictionary
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See also: Fido and fidò

English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

An acronym of the words freaks, irregulars, defects, oddities, from the 1960s.

Noun[edit]

fido (plural fidos)

  1. (numismatics) A coin that is defective, having been incorrectly minted, often prized by collectors.

Translations[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Esperanto[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin fida.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • (file)
  • IPA(key): /ˈfido/
  • Hyphenation: fi‧do
  • Rhymes: -ido

Noun[edit]

fido (uncountable, accusative fidon)

  1. faith, trust

Italian[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ˈfi.do/, [ˈfiːd̪o]
  • Hyphenation: fì‧do

Etymology 1[edit]

From Latin fīdus, from Proto-Italic *feiðos, from Proto-Indo-European *bʰeydʰos, derived from the root *bʰeydʰ- (to trust).

Adjective[edit]

fido (feminine singular fida, masculine plural fidi, feminine plural fide)

  1. faithful, loyal

Related terms[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

Back-formation from fidare.

Noun[edit]

fido m (plural fidi)

  1. (banking) A credit concession.

Etymology 3[edit]

See the etymology of the main entry.

Verb[edit]

fido

  1. first-person singular present indicative of fidare

Latin[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Proto-Italic *feiðō, from Proto-Indo-European *bʰéydʰeti (to trust), from the root *bʰeydʰ-.

Cognate to fidēs (faith) and Proto-Germanic *bīdaną.

Verb[edit]

fīdō (present infinitive fīdere, perfect active fīsus sum); third conjugation, semi-deponent

  1. I trust, put confidence in
  2. I rely upon
Conjugation[edit]
   Conjugation of fīdō (third conjugation, semi-deponent)
indicative singular plural
first second third first second third
active present fīdō fīdis fīdit fīdimus fīditis fīdunt
imperfect fīdēbam fīdēbās fīdēbat fīdēbāmus fīdēbātis fīdēbant
future fīdam fīdēs fīdet fīdēmus fīdētis fīdent
perfect fīsus + present active indicative of sum
pluperfect fīsus + imperfect active indicative of sum
future perfect fīsus + future active indicative of sum
subjunctive singular plural
first second third first second third
active present fīdam fīdās fīdat fīdāmus fīdātis fīdant
imperfect fīderem fīderēs fīderet fīderēmus fīderētis fīderent
perfect fīsus + present active subjunctive of sum
pluperfect fīsus + imperfect active subjunctive of sum
imperative singular plural
first second third first second third
active present fīde fīdite
future fīditō fīditō fīditōte fīduntō
non-finite forms active passive
present perfect future present perfect future
infinitives fīdere fīsum esse fīsūrum esse
participles fīdēns fīsus fīsūrus
verbal nouns gerund supine
genitive dative accusative ablative accusative ablative
fīdendī fīdendō fīdendum fīdendō fīsum fīsū

Old forms:

  • indicative future active: fīdēbō (This may hint to a second conjugation variation.)
Derived terms[edit]
Related terms[edit]
Descendants[edit]
  • French: fier
  • Italian: fidare
  • Mozarabic: فِدارَا(fidare)
  • Portuguese: fiar
  • Spanish: fiar

Etymology 2[edit]

See the etymology of the main entry.

Adjective[edit]

fīdō

  1. dative masculine singular of fīdus
  2. dative neuter singular of fīdus
  3. ablative masculine singular of fīdus
  4. ablative neuter singular of fīdus

References[edit]

  • fido in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • fido in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • fido in Gaffiot, Félix (1934) Dictionnaire Illustré Latin-Français, Hachette
  • Carl Meissner; Henry William Auden (1894) Latin Phrase-Book[1], London: Macmillan and Co.
    • (ambiguous) historic times: historicorum fide contestata memoria
    • (ambiguous) historic truth: historiae, rerum fides
    • (ambiguous) an acknowledged historical fact: res historiae fide comprobata
    • (ambiguous) genuine historical truth: incorrupta rerum fides
    • (ambiguous) to remain loyal: in fide manere (B. G. 7. 4. 5)
    • (ambiguous) to undermine a person's loyalty: de fide deducere or a fide abducere aliquem
    • (ambiguous) having exchanged pledges, promises: fide data et accepta (Sall. Iug. 81. 1)
    • (ambiguous) to be bound by one's word; to be on one's honour: fide obstrictum teneri (Pis. 13. 29)
    • (ambiguous) a thing finds credence, is credible: aliquid fidem habet (vid. also fides under sect. VII., History)
    • (ambiguous) to promise an oath to..: iureiurando ac fide se obstringere, ut
    • (ambiguous) credit and financial position: fides et ratio pecuniarum
    • (ambiguous) credit is going down: fides (vid. sect. IX. 10, note fides has six...) concidit
    • (ambiguous) a man's credit begins to go down: fides aliquem deficere coepit
    • (ambiguous) credit has disappeared: fides (de foro) sublata est (Leg. Agr. 2. 3. 8)
    • (ambiguous) credit is low throughout Italy: fides tota Italia est angusta

Spanish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin fīdus.

Adjective[edit]

fido (feminine singular fida, masculine plural fidos, feminine plural fidas)

  1. faithful, loyal