focus

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English[edit]

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Etymology[edit]

Latin focus (hearth, fireplace), of unknown origin. Usually connected with Old Armenian բոց (bocʿ).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

focus (countable and uncountable, plural foci or focuses)

  1. (countable, optics) A point at which reflected or refracted rays of light converge.
    The heat of sunlight at the focus of a magnifying glass can easily set dry leaves on fire.
  2. (countable, geometry) A point of a conic at which rays reflected from a curve or surface converge.
  3. (uncountable, photography, cinematography) The fact of the convergence of light on the photographic medium.
    • 2013 July-August, Catherine Clabby, “Focus on Everything”, American Scientist: 
      Not long ago, it was difficult to produce photographs of tiny creatures with every part in focus. [] A photo processing technique called focus stacking has changed that. Developed as a tool to electronically combine the sharpest bits of multiple digital images, focus stacking is a boon to biologists seeking full focus on a micron scale.
    Unfortunately, the license plate is out of focus in this image.
  4. (uncountable, photography, cinematography) The quality of the convergence of light on the photographic medium.
    During this scene, the boy’s face shifts subtly from soft focus into sharp focus.
  5. (uncountable) Concentration of attention.
    I believe I can bring the high degree of focus required for this important job.
  6. (countable, seismology) The exact point of where an earthquake occurs, in three dimensions.
    The earthquake's focus was at exactly 37 degrees north, 18 degrees south, seventy five meters below the ground.
  7. (computing, graphical user interface) The indicator of the currently active element in a user interface.
    Text entered at the keyboard or pasted from a clipboard is sent to the component which currently has the focus.
  8. (linguistics) The most important word or phrase in a sentence or passage, or the one that imparts information.

Translations[edit]

Verb[edit]

focus (third-person singular simple present focuses or, less commonly, focusses, present participle focusing or, less commonly, focussing, simple past and past participle focused or, less commonly, focussed)

  1. (transitive) To cause (rays of light, etc) to converge at a single point.
  2. (transitive) To adjust (a lens, an optical instrument) in order to position an image with respect to the focal plane.
    You'll need to focus the microscope carefully in order to capture the full detail of this surface.
  3. (transitive, followed by on or upon) To concentrate one's attention.
    Focus on passing the test.
  4. (intransitive) To concentrate one’s attention.
    If you're going to beat your competitors, you need to focus.

Usage notes[edit]

The spellings focusses, focussing, focussed are more common in Commonwealth English than in American English, but in both varieties they are less common than the spellings focuses, focusing, focused.

Derived terms[edit]

Related terms[edit]

Translations[edit]


Italian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from Latin focus, whence also Italian fuoco (an inherited doublet).

Noun[edit]

focus m (invariable)

  1. focus (all senses)

Latin[edit]

Wikipedia-logo.png
 Focus on Latin Wikipedia

Wikipedia la

Etymology[edit]

The origin is uncertain. Usually connected with Old Armenian բոց (bocʿ).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

focus m (genitive focī); second declension

  1. hearth, fireplace

Inflection[edit]

Second declension.

Number Singular Plural
nominative focus focī
genitive focī focōrum
dative focō focīs
accusative focum focōs
ablative focō focīs
vocative foce focī

Derived terms[edit]

Related terms[edit]

Descendants[edit]