frain

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See also: Frain

English[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle English frainen, freinen ‎(to ask), from Old English freġnan, friġnan ‎(to ask, inquire, learn), from Proto-Germanic *fregnaną ‎(to ask), from Proto-Indo-European *preḱ- ‎(to ask, woo). Cognate with Icelandic fregna ‎(to ask, inquire), Gothic 𐍆𐍂𐌰𐌹𐌷𐌽𐌰𐌽 ‎(fraihnan, to ask). Related also to Dutch vragen ‎(to ask), German fragen ‎(to ask), Norwegian frega ‎(to ask), Latin precor ‎(ask, beseech), Albanian preh ‎(rest, burial, tomb), Lithuanian prašyti ‎(to request), Polish prosić ‎(to request).

Verb[edit]

frain ‎(third-person singular simple present frains, present participle fraining, simple past and past participle frained)

  1. (transitive, dialectal or obsolete) To ask, inquire.
    • 1522, John Skelton, Why come ye nat to Courte:
      Ones yet agayne Of you I wolde frayne, Why come ye nat to court ?
    • 1555, Parker, Psalme. XXVIII.:
      Theyr myndes disdayne: Gods actes to frain [...]
    • 1575-6, Durham, Depositions and Other:
      And so answerd ever when so the said Umphra frayned the said Thomas ; and otherwaies this examinate never hard the said Thomas speak anything of himself to any bodye, duringe the spaic of an hower or more, that this examinate was with the said Thomas.
    • 1592, Warner, Albion's England. Book VII:
      I, musing, frain'd her meaning: she / Her meaning thus did tell.
    • 1803, Amadis de Gaul: A Poem in Three Books - Page 160:
      Nor far had spurr'd the warrior, ere a crew Of hinds and sun-burnt woodmen met his view, Frayn'd by the knight, they told, a beauteous maid, Who, loudly shrieking, call'd on heav'n for aid, [...]
    • 1807, Samuel Henshall, translating "The Durham Book" (c. 900); The Gothic Gospel of saint Matthew:
      But Jesus stood before the count; yea the count frayned him, quothing, thou is king of the Jews? but Jesus quoth to him, thou quoths.

Derived terms[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Middle English[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old English freġn, fræġn ‎(question), akin to Old English friġnan ‎(to ask).

Noun[edit]

frain

  1. question

Related terms[edit]


Old French[edit]

Noun[edit]

frain m ‎(oblique plural frainz, nominative singular frainz, nominative plural frain)

  1. bit (equipment placed in a horse's mouth)

Descendants[edit]


Scots[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle English fraynen, frainen, freinen, from Old English freġnan ‎(to ask) and Old Norse fregna ‎(to ask).

Verb[edit]

frain ‎(third-person singular present frains, present participle frainin, past fraint, past participle fraint)

  1. (transitive) to ask, ask about, ask for
  2. to enquire
  3. (intransitive) to make inquiry
  4. to request

Related terms[edit]


Welsh[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

frain

  1. Soft mutation of brain.