frantic

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English[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle English, from Old French, from Medieval Latin freneticus, Latin phreneticus or phreniticus, from Ancient Greek *φρενητικός (*phrenētikós), correctly φρενιτικός (phrenitikós, mad, suffering from inflammation of the brain), from φρενῖτις (phrenîtis, inflammation of the brain), from φρήν (phrḗn, the brain).

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

frantic (comparative more frantic, superlative most frantic)

  1. (archaic) Insane, mentally unstable.
    • 1526, William Tyndale, trans. Bible, Matthew XV:
      Master have mercy on my sonne, for he is franticke: and ys sore vexed.
    • c. 1599, William Shakespeare, As You Like It, Act I, Scene 3,[1]
      If with myself I hold intelligence,
      Or have acquaintance with mine own desires;
      If that I do not dream, or be not frantic
      As I do trust I am not—then, dear uncle,
      Never so much as in a thought unborn
      Did I offend your Highness.
  2. In a state of panic, worry, frenzy or rush.
    They returned the missing child to his frantic mother.
  3. Extremely energetic
    frantic music
    • 2011 October 1, Phil McNulty, “Everton 0 - 2 Liverpool”, in BBC Sport[2]:
      At the end of a frantic first 45 minutes, there was still time for Charlie Adam to strike the bar from 20 yards before referee Atkinson departed to a deafening chorus of jeering from Everton's fans.

Synonyms[edit]

Translations[edit]

Related terms[edit]

Noun[edit]

frantic (plural frantics)

  1. (archaic) A person who is insane or mentally unstable, madman.
    • 1595, George Peele, The Old Wives’ Tale, The Malone Society Reprints, 1908, lines 3-5,[3]
      How nowe fellowe Franticke, what all a mort? Doth this sadnes become thy madnes?
    • 1657, Aston Cockayne, The Obstinate Lady, London: Isaac Pridmore, Act V, Scene 3, p. 56,[4]
      [] who but sensless Franticks would have thoughts so poor? My Reason forsakes the government of this weak Frame, and I am fall’n into disorder []
    • 1721, Cotton Mather, diary entry for 16 July, 1721 in Diary of Cotton Mather, 1709-1724, Massachusetts Historical Society Collections, Seventh Series, Volume VIII, Boston: 1912, p. 632,[5]
      The Destroyer, being enraged at the Proposal of any Thing, that may rescue the Lives of our poor People from him, has taken a strange Possession of the People on this Occasion. They rave, they rail, they blaspheme; they talk not only like Ideots but also like Franticks, []

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