frig

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English[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Middle English friggen (to quiver), perhaps from Old English *frygian (to rub, caress), related to Old English frēogan, frīgan (to love, release, embrace, caress), frīge (pl., love). More at free.

Alternative etymology derives frig (Early Modern English frigge) from Middle English frikien (to keep (the arms and hands) in constant motion), from Old English frician (to dance).

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /fɹɪɡ/
  • (file)
    Rhymes: -ɪɡ

Verb[edit]

frig (third-person singular simple present frigs, present participle frigging, simple past and past participle frigged)

  1. (intransitive, obsolete) to fidget, to wriggle around
    Will you sit down and stop frigging around.
  2. (transitive, intransitive) to masturbate
    She never forgot the day she was caught frigging herself in the library.
    • 1880, anonymous, The Pearl:
      There was an old parson of Lundy,
      Fell asleep in his vestry on Sunday;
      He awoke with a scream,
      "What, another wet dream,
      This comes of not frigging since Monday."
  3. (transitive, intransitive, euphemistic) to fuck (misapplied euphemism)
    Come on honey, let’s frig.
  4. (intransitive) to mess or muck (about, around etc.)
    Be sensible, you’re just frigging about now.
  5. (transitive, intransitive) to make a temporary alteration to something, to fudge, to manipulate
    The system wasn't working but I've frigged the data and it's usable now.
Synonyms[edit]
Derived terms[edit]
Translations[edit]

Noun[edit]

frig (plural frigs)

  1. An act of frigging.
  2. A temporary modification to a piece of equipment to change the way it operates (usually away from as originally designed).
    I had to put a couple of frigs across the switch relays but it works now.
  3. (euphemistic) A fuck.
    I don’t give a frig!

Etymology 2[edit]

See fridge.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

frig (plural friges)

  1. Dated spelling of fridge.
    • 1936, F.J. Thwaites, chapter XIII, in The Redemption, Sydney: H. John Edwards, published 1940, page 139:
      "Perhaps you prefer beer - there's plenty in the frig."

Anagrams[edit]


Aromanian[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Latin frīgus. Compare Daco-Romanian frig.

Alternative forms[edit]

Noun[edit]

frig n (plural friguri)

  1. cold, coldness
Related terms[edit]
See also[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

From Latin frīgō. Compare Romanian frige, frig.

Alternative forms[edit]

Verb[edit]

frig (past participle) (third-person singular present indicative fridzi / fridze, past participle friptã)

  1. I roast, grill.
Related terms[edit]

Cornish[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

  • (Revived Middle Cornish) IPA(key): [friːɡ]

Noun[edit]

frig m (dual dewfrik, plural frigow)

  1. nostril

Romanian[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Latin frīgus (cold), ultimately from Proto-Indo-European *sriHgos-, *sriges-, *sriHges-.

Noun[edit]

frig n (plural friguri)

  1. cold, frigidity
  2. (in the plural, popular variant frigură) fever, chill
Declension[edit]
Synonyms[edit]
Antonyms[edit]
Related terms[edit]
See also[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

Verb[edit]

frig

  1. inflection of frige:
    1. first-person singular present indicative/subjunctive
    2. third-person plural present indicative

Welsh[edit]

Noun[edit]

frig

  1. Soft mutation of brig.

Mutation[edit]

Welsh mutation
radical soft nasal aspirate
brig frig mrig unchanged
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.