fugacious

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English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin fugācius, comparative of fugāciter (evasively, fleetingly), from fugāx (transitory, fleeting), from fugiō (I flee).

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

fugacious (comparative more fugacious, superlative most fugacious)

  1. Fleeting, fading quickly, transient.
    • 1906, O. Henry, "The Furnished Room", in The Four Million:
      Restless, shifting, fugacious as time itself is a certain vast bulk of the population of the red brick district of the lower West Side. Homeless, they have a hundred homes.
    • 1916, George Edmund De Schweinitz, Diseases of the Eye, page 589:
      Watering of the eye, conjunctival congestion, distinct catarrhal conjunctivitis, and deep-seated scleral congestions, sometimes fugacious, and often accompanied by intense headache []
    • 2011, Michael Feeney Callan, Robert Redford: The Biography, Alfred A. Knopf (2011), ISBN 9780307272973, page xvii:
      It may be that Redford's fugacious nature is not so mysterious, that it is studded in the artwork of the labs and the very stones of Sundance.

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