gainithir

Definition from Wiktionary, the free dictionary
Jump to navigation Jump to search

Old Irish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Celtic *ganyetor, from Proto-Indo-European *ǵn̥h₁yétor, deponent present of *ǵenh₁-.

Verb[edit]

gainithir (conjunct ·gainedar, verbal noun gein)

  1. to be born
    • c. 750-800, Tairired na nDessi from Rawlinson B 502, published in "The Expulsion of the Dessi", Y Cymmrodor (1901, Society of Cymmrodorion), edited and with translations by Kuno Meyer, vol. 14, pp. 104-135, paragraph 8
      B[irt] Cui[ni]u ingin dó .i. Eithne Úatha[ch]. Bæ Bri mac Bairceda in druí isin dún in aidchi ro·genair Eithne.
      Cuiniu bore a daughter to [Crimthann], i.e. Eithne the Dread. The druid Bri, son of Baircid, was in the fort in the night when Eithne was born.
    • c. 800, Würzburg Glosses on the Pauline Epistles, published in Thesaurus Palaeohibernicus (reprinted 1987, Dublin Institute for Advanced Studies), edited and with translations by Whitley Stokes and John Strachan, vol. I, pp. 499–712, Wb. 11a17
      .i. a n-ail inna ndead ɫ. int uisque iarsin ganim ɫ. is hé Crist ro·genir post.
      [describing a rock] i.e. their rock behind them, or the water along the sand, or it is Christ who was born post.
    • c. 800–825, Diarmait, Milan Glosses on the Psalms, published in Thesaurus Palaeohibernicus (reprinted 1987, Dublin Institute for Advanced Studies), edited and with translations by Whitley Stokes and John Strachan, vol. I, pp. 7–483, Ml. 44a11
      .i. intan do·fuissemar sechtair a síl-sin ⁊ gainethar hón mathir is and is ainm dó fructus.
      i.e. when that seed is brought forth and is born of the mother, it is then that its name is fructus.

Inflection[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Descendants[edit]

  • Irish: gin
  • Scottish Gaelic: gin

References[edit]