gem

Definition from Wiktionary, the free dictionary
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See also: gém, gêm, Gem, and GEM

Translingual[edit]

Symbol[edit]

gem

  1. (international standards) ISO 639-2 & ISO 639-5 language code for Germanic languages.

English[edit]

Wikipedia-logo.png
 gemstone on Wikipedia

Etymology[edit]

Inherited from Middle English gemme, gimme, yimme, ȝimme, from Old English ġimm, from Proto-West Germanic *gimmu (gem) and Old French gemme (gem), both from Latin gemma (a swelling bud; jewel, gem). Doublet of gemma and Gemma.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

gem (countable and uncountable, plural gems)

  1. A precious stone, usually of substantial monetary value or prized for its beauty or shine.
  2. (figuratively) Any precious or highly valued thing or person.
    She's an absolute gem.
    • 2017 January 20, Annie Zaleski, “AFI sounds refreshed and rejuvenated on its 10th album, AFI (The Blood Album)”, in The Onion AV Club[2]:
      Standout “Hidden Knives” is the kind of new wave-leaning punk gem John Hughes would’ve loved, while “So Beneath You” is a teeth-baring, roiling tune.
  3. Anything of small size, or expressed within brief limits, which is regarded as a gem on account of its beauty or value, such as a small picture, a verse of poetry, or an epigram.
    a gem of wit
  4. (obsolete) A gemma or leaf-bud.
    • c. 1668, John Denham (translator), Of Old Age by Cato the Elder, Part 3, in Poems and Translations, with The Sophy, London: H. Herringman, 4th edition, 1773, p. 35,[3]
      Then from the Joynts of thy prolifick Stemm
      A swelling Knot is raised (call’d a Gemm)
    • 1727, James Thomson, “Summer”, in The Seasons, London: [] A[ndrew] Millar, and sold by Thomas Cadell, [], published 1768, OCLC 642619686:
      Among the crooked Lanes, on every Hedge, / The Glow-Worm lights his Gem [] .
    • 1803, John Browne Cutting, “A Succinct History of Jamaica” in Robert Charles Dallas, The History of the Maroons, London: Longman and Rees, Volume 1, p. xcii,[4]
      In about twelve days the sprouts from the gems of the planted cane are seen []
  5. A type of geometrid moth, Orthonama obstipata.
  6. (computing) A package containing programs or libraries for the Ruby programming language.
  7. (uncountable, printing, uncommon, obsolete) A size of type between brilliant (4-point) and diamond (4½-point), running 222 lines to the foot.

Synonyms[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Translations[edit]

Verb[edit]

gem (third-person singular simple present gems, present participle gemming, simple past and past participle gemmed)

  1. (transitive) To adorn with, or as if with, gems.
    • 1813, Percy Bysshe Shelley, “Canto I”, in Queen Mab; [], London: [] P. B. Shelley, [], OCLC 36924440, page 6:
      [T]he fair star / That gems the glittering coronet of morn, / Sheds not a light so mild, so powerful, / As that which, bursting from the Fairy's form, / Spread a purpureal halo round the scene, / Yet with an undulating motion, / Swayed to her outline gracefully.
    • 1827, Various, The Mirror of Literature, Amusement, and Instruction, Vol. 10,[5]:
      A few bright and beautiful stars gemmed the wide concave of heaven [] .
    • 1872, J. Fenimore Cooper, The Bravo[6]:
      Above was the firmament, gemmed with worlds, and sublime in immensity.
    • 1920, John Freeman, Poems New and Old[7]:
      The rain Shook from fruit bushes in new showers again As I brushed past, and gemmed the window pane.

Synonyms[edit]

See also[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Albanian[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Together with gemb, a phonetic variant of gjemb.[1]

Noun[edit]

gem m

  1. branch

Derived terms[edit]

Related terms[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Orel, Vladimir (1998), “gem”, in Albanian Etymological Dictionary, Leiden, Boston, Cologne: Brill, →ISBN, page 112

Cimbrian[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle High German geben, from Old High German geban, from Proto-West Germanic *geban, from Proto-Germanic *gebaną.

Cognate with German geben, Dutch geven, obsolete English yive, Icelandic gefa.

Verb[edit]

gem (strong class 5, auxiliary håm)

  1. (Luserna) to give

References[edit]


Danish[edit]

Verb[edit]

gem

  1. imperative of gemme

Meriam[edit]

Noun[edit]

gem

  1. body

Polish[edit]

Polish Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia pl

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from English game, from Middle English game, gamen, gammen, from Old English gamen (sport, joy, mirth, pastime, game, amusement, pleasure), from Proto-West Germanic *gaman, from Proto-Germanic *gamaną (amusement, pleasure, game), from *ga- (collective prefix) + *mann- (man); or alternatively from *ga- + a root from Proto-Indo-European *men- (to think, have in mind).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

gem m inan

  1. (tennis) game (part of a set)

Declension[edit]

Further reading[edit]

  • gem in Wielki słownik języka polskiego, Instytut Języka Polskiego PAN
  • gem in Polish dictionaries at PWN

Romanian[edit]

gem

Etymology 1[edit]

From English jam.

Noun[edit]

gem n (plural gemuri)

  1. jam (sweet mixture of fruit boiled with sugar)
Declension[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

Verb[edit]

gem

  1. inflection of geme:
    1. first-person singular present indicative/subjunctive
    2. third-person plural present indicative

Swedish[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

The paper clip's most common design was originally thought to be made by The Gem Manufacturing Company in Britain in the 1870s.[1] More at paper clip.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

gem n

  1. a paper clip
Declension[edit]
Declension of gem 
Singular Plural
Indefinite Definite Indefinite Definite
Nominative gem gemet gem gemen
Genitive gems gemets gems gemens

Etymology 2[edit]

Borrowed from English game.

Noun[edit]

gem n

  1. alternative spelling of game

References[edit]

  1. ^ Petroski, Henry: "Polishing the Gem: A First-Year Design Project", Journal of Engineering Education, October 1998, p. 445

Volapük[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Perhaps borrowed from French germain.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

gem (nominative plural gems)

  1. sibling
    • 1949, "Lifajenäd brefik cifala: ‚Jakob Sprenger‛", in Volapükagased pro Nedänapükans, issue 4, 13-14.
      ‚Jakob‛ äbinom cil mälid se gems vel: blods lul e sörs tel.
      Jakob was the sixth child out of seven siblings: five brothers and two sisters.

Declension[edit]

Hyponyms[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

  • (collective) gemef (brother(s) and/or sister(s))
  • (adjective) gemik (sibling)