gene

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See also: Gene, gène, gêne, gêné, ĝene, Genė, and -gène

English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From German Gen, from Ancient Greek γενεά (geneá, generation, descent), from the aorist infinitive of γίγνομαι (gígnomai, I come into being). Coined by the Danish biologist Wilhelm Ludvig Johannsen in a German-language publication, from the last syllable of pangene.[1]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

gene (plural genes)

  1. (genetics) A theoretical unit of heredity of living organisms; a gene may take several values and in principle predetermines a precise trait of an organism's form (phenotype), such as hair color.
    Coordinate term: cistron
  2. (molecular biology) A segment of DNA or RNA from a cell's or an organism's genome, that may take several forms and thus parameterizes a phenomenon, in general the structure of a protein; locus.
    • 2019, Bill Bryson, The Body: A Guide for Occupants, Black Swan (2020), page 7:
      A length of DNA is divided into segments called chromosomes and shorter individual units called genes.
    A change in a gene is reflected in the protein or RNA molecule that it codes for.

Usage notes[edit]

In the simplest case and in principle, a gene locus is supposed to be the physical reality corresponding to the theoretical gene unit of heredity; in practice, things are far more complicated and confused, which is well known and acknowledged. However, these questions are the subject of still very active scientific research, as well as the topic of both scientific and philosophical questions, especially on the real compatibility between both senses of the term.

Derived terms[edit]

Related terms[edit]

See also[edit]

Translations[edit]

Further reading[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Wilhelm Ludvig Johannsen (1909) Elemente der exakten Erblichkeitslehre [Elements of exact heredity]‎[1] (in German), Jena: Gustav Fischer, page 124:
    Darum scheint es am einfachsten, aus Darwin's[sic] bekanntem Wort die uns allein interessierende letzte Silbe „Gen“ isoliert zu verwerten, um damit das schlechte, mehrdeutige Wort „Anlage“ zu ersetzen.

Anagrams[edit]


Danish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From French gêne.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /sjeːnə/, [ˈɕeːnə]

Noun[edit]

gene c (singular definite genen, plural indefinite gener)

  1. inconvenience, nuisance (something that bothers)
    Røgen fra skorstenen er til gene for naboerne.
    The smoke from the chimney is bothering the neighbours.

Inflection[edit]

References[edit]


Dutch[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

gene

  1. Inflected form of geen

Anagrams[edit]


Italian[edit]

Italian Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia it

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ˈd͡ʒɛ.ne/
  • Rhymes: -ɛne
  • Hyphenation: gè‧ne

Etymology 1[edit]

From German Gen.

Noun[edit]

gene m (plural geni)

  1. (genetics) gene
Related terms[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

See the etymology of the corresponding lemma form.

Noun[edit]

gene f pl

  1. plural of gena

Middle Dutch[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Dutch *gēn, from Proto-Germanic *jainaz.

Pronunciation[edit]

Determiner[edit]

gêne

  1. that over there, yonder

Descendants[edit]

  • Dutch: geen

Further reading[edit]


Portuguese[edit]

Noun[edit]

gene m (plural genes)

  1. (genetics) gene

Related terms[edit]

Further reading[edit]

  • gene” in Dicionário Priberam da Língua Portuguesa.

Romanian[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

Noun[edit]

gene f

  1. indefinite plural of genă
  2. indefinite genitive/dative singular of genă

Etymology 2[edit]

Noun[edit]

gene f

  1. indefinite plural of geană
  2. indefinite genitive/dative singular of geană

Spanish[edit]

Noun[edit]

gene m (plural genes)

  1. gene
    Synonym: gen

Turkish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Turkic *yana (*yana, again), from Proto-Turkic *yan- (to return, turn back).

Adverb[edit]

gene

  1. (colloquial) yine (again)

Noun[edit]

gene

  1. dative singular of gen