grave

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See also: gravé and -grave

Contents

English[edit]

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 Grave on Wikipedia

Wikipedia

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Middle English grave, grafe, from Old English græf ‎(cave, grave, trench), from Proto-Germanic *grabą, *grabō ‎(grave, trench, ditch), from Proto-Indo-European *gʰrābʰ- ‎(to dig, scratch, scrape). Cognate with West Frisian grêf ‎(grave), Dutch graf ‎(grave), Low German Graf ‎(a grave), Graff, German Grab ‎(grave), Danish and Swedish grav ‎(grave), Icelandic gröf ‎(grave). Cognate to Albanian gropë ‎(a ditch, hole). Related to groove.

Noun[edit]

A freshly dug grave

grave ‎(plural graves)

  1. An excavation in the earth as a place of burial; also, any place of interment; a tomb; a sepulcher.
    • (Can we date this quote?), John 11:17:
      He had lain in the grave four days.
    • 1856, Eleanor Marx-Aveling (translator), Gustave Flaubert (author), Madame Bovary, Part III, Chapter X:
      They reached the cemetery. The men went right down to a place in the grass where a grave was dug. They ranged themselves all round; and while the priest spoke, the red soil thrown up at the sides kept noiselessly slipping down at the corners.
  2. death, destruction.
Derived terms[edit]
Translations[edit]

See also[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

From Middle English graven, from Old English grafan ‎(to dig, dig up, grave, engrave, carve, chisel), from Proto-Germanic *grabaną ‎(to dig), from Proto-Indo-European *gʰrebʰ- ‎(to dig, scratch, scrape). Cognate with Dutch graven ‎(to dig), German graben ‎(to dig), Swedish gräva ‎(to dig).

Verb[edit]

grave ‎(third-person singular simple present graves, present participle graving, simple past graved or grove, past participle graved or graven)

  1. (transitive, obsolete) To dig.
  2. (transitive, obsolete) To carve or cut, as letters or figures, on some hard substance; to engrave.
    • Exodus 28:9:
      Thou shalt take two onyx stones, and grave on them the names of the children of Israel.
    • 1872, James De Mille, The Cryptogram[1], HTML edition, The Gutenberg Project, published 2009:
      Deep lines were graven on her pale forehead, and on her wan, thin cheeks.
    • (Can we date this quote?) Robert Louis Stevenson, Requiem:
      This be the verse you grave for me / "Here he lies where he longs to be"
  3. (transitive, obsolete) To carve out or give shape to, by cutting with a chisel; to sculpture; as, to grave an image.
  4. (transitive, obsolete) To impress deeply (on the mind); to fix indelibly.
  5. (transitive, obsolete) To entomb; to bury.
  6. (transitive, obsolete, nautical) To clean, as a vessel's bottom, of barnacles, grass, etc., and pay it over with pitch — so called because graves or greaves was formerly used for this purpose.
  7. (intransitive, obsolete) To write or delineate on hard substances, by means of incised lines; to practice engraving.

Related terms[edit]

Translations[edit]

Etymology 3[edit]

From French grave, from Latin gravis ‎(heavy, important).

Adjective[edit]

grave ‎(comparative graver, superlative gravest)

  1. (obsolete) Influential, important; authoritative. [16th-18th c.]
  2. Characterised by a dignified sense of seriousness; not cheerful, sombre. [from 16th c.]
  3. Low in pitch, tone etc. [from 17th c.]
    • (Can we date this quote?) Moore, Encyclopedia of Music:
      The thicker the cord or string, the more grave is the note or tone.
  4. Serious, in a negative sense; important, formidable. [from 19th c.]
    • 2016 February 6, James Zogby, “Israel’s prickliness blocks the long quest for peace”, in The National[2]:
      Israel’s behaviour is doing grave damage to the Palestinian people and to any hope for peace.
Synonyms[edit]
The terms below need to be checked and allocated to the definitions (senses) of the headword above. Each term should appear in the sense for which it is appropriate. Use the template {{sense|"gloss"}}, substituting a short version of the definition for "gloss".
Translations[edit]

Noun[edit]

grave ‎(plural graves)

  1. A written accent used in French, Italian, and other languages. è is an e with a grave accent.
Translations[edit]

Statistics[edit]

Most common English words before 1923: complete · access · ways · #951: grave · serious · possession · move

Danish[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ɡraːvə/, [ˈɡ̊ʁɑːvə]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Italian grave, from Latin gravis ‎(heavy, grave).

Adverb[edit]

grave

  1. (music) grave (low in pitch, tone etc.)
  2. accent graveaccent grave, grave accent

Etymology 2[edit]

From Old Norse grafa ‎(to dig, bury), from Proto-Germanic *grabaną, from Proto-Indo-European *gʰrābʰ- ‎(to dig, scratch, scrape).

Verb[edit]

grave ‎(imperative grav, infinitive at grave, present tense graver, past tense gravede, perfect tense har gravet)

  1. dig (to move hard-packed earth out of the way)
Derived terms[edit]

Etymology 3[edit]

See grav ‎(grave, tomb, pit).

Noun[edit]

grave c

  1. plural indefinite of grav

Dutch[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

grave

  1. (archaic) singular present subjunctive of graven

Anagrams[edit]


Esperanto[edit]

Adverb[edit]

grave

  1. seriously, gravely

French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowing from Latin gravis. Doublet of grief.

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

grave m, f ‎(plural graves)

  1. serious
  2. solemn

Adverb[edit]

grave

  1. (informal) much; a lot
    Je te kiffe grave !
    I love you like crazy!

Related terms[edit]

Verb[edit]

grave

  1. first-person singular present indicative of graver
  2. third-person singular present indicative of graver
  3. first-person singular present subjunctive of graver
  4. first-person singular present subjunctive of graver
  5. second-person singular imperative of graver

Anagrams[edit]

External links[edit]


Italian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowing from Latin gravis. Doublet of greve.

Adjective[edit]

grave m, f ‎(masculine and feminine plural gravi)

  1. grave, serious
  2. heavy
  3. solemn

Synonyms[edit]

Antonyms[edit]

Related terms[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Latin[edit]

Adjective[edit]

grave

  1. nominative neuter singular of gravis
  2. accusative neuter singular of gravis
  3. vocative neuter singular of gravis

Middle French[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old French grave.

Noun[edit]

grave f (plural graves)

  1. gravel

Descendants[edit]

References[edit]

  • (fr) Godefroy, Frédéric, Dictionnaire de l'ancienne langue française et de tous ses dialectes du IXe au XVe siècle (1881) (grave)

Middle High German[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old High German grāfo, grāvo, grāfio, grāvio ‎(count, local judge).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

grâve m

  1. count, local judge

Declension[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Descendants[edit]

References[edit]

  • grâve” Benecke, Georg Friedrich, Wilhelm Müller, and Friedrich Zarncke. Mittelhochdeutsches Wörterbuch: mit benutzung des Nachlasses von Benecke. Vol. 1. S. Hirzel, 1863.

Norwegian Bokmål[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Norse grafa, from Proto-Germanic *grabaną, from Proto-Indo-European *gʰrābʰ- ‎(to dig, scratch, scrape).

Verb[edit]

grave ‎(imperative grav, present tense graver, passive graves, simple past gravde or grov, past participle gravd, present participle gravende)

  1. to dig
  2. grave ut - to excavate

Derived terms[edit]

References[edit]


Norwegian Nynorsk[edit]

Verb[edit]

grave ‎(present tense grev, past tense grov, past participle grave, passive infinitive gravast, present participle gravande, imperative grav)

  1. Alternative form of grava

Old French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Probably via Gaulish from Celtic *graw, related to Cornish grow ‎(gravel), Breton grouan, and Welsh gro ‎(gravel); ultimately from Proto-Indo-European *gʰr-eu-d-.

Alternative forms[edit]

Noun[edit]

grave f ‎(oblique plural graves, nominative singular grave, nominative plural graves)

  1. gravel

Descendants[edit]

References[edit]

  • (fr) Godefroy, Frédéric, Dictionnaire de l'ancienne langue française et de tous ses dialectes du IXe au XVe siècle (1881) (grave)

Portuguese[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Old Portuguese grave, from Latin gravis ‎(heavy; grave), from Proto-Indo-European *gʷréh₂us.

Adjective[edit]

grave m, f ‎(plural graves, comparable)

  1. serious; grave (having possible severe negative consequences)
    Sofria de uma doença grave.
    He suffered from a serious disease.
  2. (of sound) low-pitched; grave (low in pitch or tone)
    O som da tuba é mais grave do que o do trombone.
    The sound of the tuba has a lower pitch than that of the trombone.
  3. grave; serious; sombre; austere; solemn (characterised by a dignified sense of seriousness)
    O programa tinha um tom grave.
    The program had a serious tone.
  4. (archaic, physics) that falls down; that doesn’t float
    O balão não é um corpo grave.
    Balloons are not a falling body.
Inflection[edit]
Synonyms[edit]
Antonyms[edit]

Noun[edit]

grave f (plural graves)

  1. (music) a low-pitched note

Etymology 2[edit]

Verb[edit]

grave

  1. first-person singular (eu) present subjunctive of gravar
  2. third-person singular (ele and ela, also used with você and others) present subjunctive of gravar
  3. third-person singular (você) affirmative imperative of gravar
  4. third-person singular (você) negative imperative of gravar

Spanish[edit]

Spanish Wikipedia has an article on:

Wikipedia es

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): [ˈɣ̞ɾa̠.be̞], [ˈɣ̞ɾa̠.β̞e̞]
  • Homphones: grabe
  • See also: bagre

Etymology 1[edit]

From Latin gravis.

Adjective[edit]

grave m, f ‎(plural graves)

  1. serious, grave
  2. bass (sound)
  3. solemn
  4. (grammar) stressed in the penultimate syllable; paroxytone
Related terms[edit]
Coordinate terms[edit]
Synonyms[edit]
Antonyms[edit]
See also[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

Verb[edit]

grave

  1. Formal second-person singular (usted) imperative form of gravar.
  2. First-person singular (yo) present subjunctive form of gravar.
  3. Formal second-person singular (usted) present subjunctive form of gravar.
  4. Third-person singular (él, ella, also used with usted?) present subjunctive form of gravar.

Anagrams[edit]


Swedish[edit]

Adjective[edit]

grave

  1. absolute definite natural masculine form of grav.