gravitas

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See also: gravitás

English[edit]

English Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from Latin gravitās (weight, heaviness). Doublet of gravity.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

gravitas (uncountable)

  1. Seriousness in bearing or manner; dignity.
    • 2020 January 7, Katie Glueck; Shane Goldmacher, “Joe Biden, Seeking Commander-in-Chief Moment, Denounces Trump’s Iran Escalation”, in The New York Times[1], ISSN 0362-4331:
      “Because he refuses to level with the American people about the dangers which he has placed American troops and our diplomatic corps, personnel and civilians, as well as our partners and allies, or demonstrated even a modicum of presidential gravitas, I will attempt to do that,” said Mr. Biden, who is one of 14 candidates seeking the Democratic presidential nomination.
  2. (figuratively) Substance, weight.
    • 2013 August 2, Paul Krugman, “Sex, Money and Gravitas”, in The New York Times[2], ISSN 0362-4331:
      The other campaign against Ms. Yellen has been subtler, involving repeated suggestions — almost always off the record — that she lacks the “gravitas” to lead the Fed. What does that mean? [] Sorry, but it’s hard to escape the conclusion that gravitas, in this context, mainly means possessing a Y chromosome.
    • 2014 September 7, Natalie Angier, “The Moon comes around again”, in The New York Times[3]:
      Unlike most moons of the solar system, ours has the heft, the gravitational gravitas, to pull itself into a sphere.

Usage notes[edit]

Sometimes used in a jocular or stilted sense.

Related terms[edit]

Translations[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Esperanto[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

gravitas

  1. present of graviti

French[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

gravitas

  1. second-person singular past historic of graviter

Ido[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

gravitas

  1. present of gravitar

Latin[edit]

English Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia

Etymology[edit]

From gravis (heavy) +‎ -tās.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

gravitās f (genitive gravitātis); third declension

  1. weight, heaviness
  2. gravity, seriousness
  3. severity, harshness
    gravitās caelīseverity of the weather
  4. importance, presence, influence
  5. pregnancy
    Synonym: graviditās
  6. unwholesomeness, heaviness (in affecting one's health)
  7. fetidness, rankness, offensiveness
  8. (New Latin, physics) gravity

Declension[edit]

Third-declension noun.

Case Singular Plural
Nominative gravitās gravitātēs
Genitive gravitātis gravitātum
Dative gravitātī gravitātibus
Accusative gravitātem gravitātēs
Ablative gravitāte gravitātibus
Vocative gravitās gravitātēs

Related terms[edit]

Descendants[edit]

References[edit]

  • gravitas in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • gravitas in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • gravitas in Charles du Fresne du Cange’s Glossarium Mediæ et Infimæ Latinitatis (augmented edition, 1883–1887)
  • gravitas in Gaffiot, Félix (1934) Dictionnaire illustré Latin-Français, Hachette
  • Carl Meissner; Henry William Auden (1894) Latin Phrase-Book[4], London: Macmillan and Co.
    • healthy climate: caelum salūbre, salubritas caeli (opp. grave, gravitas)

Portuguese[edit]

Verb[edit]

gravitas

  1. second-person singular (tu) present indicative of gravitar

Spanish[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ɡɾaˈbitas/, [ɡɾaˈβ̞i.t̪as]

Verb[edit]

gravitas

  1. Informal second-person singular () present indicative form of gravitar.