halt

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See also: Halt and hält

English[edit]

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Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Middle English halten, from Old English healtian ‎(to be lame, walk with a limp), from Proto-Germanic *haltōną. English usage in the sense of 'make a halt' is from the noun. Cognate with North Frisian halte, Swedish halta.

Verb[edit]

halt ‎(third-person singular simple present halts, present participle halting, simple past and past participle halted)

  1. (intransitive) To limp; move with a limping gait.
  2. (intransitive) To stand in doubt whether to proceed, or what to do; hesitate; be uncertain; linger; delay; mammer.
    • Bible, 1 Kings xviii. 21
      How long halt ye between two opinions?
  3. (intransitive) To be lame, faulty, or defective, as in connection with ideas, or in measure, or in versification.

Etymology 2[edit]

From Old French halte, from Old High German halten ‎(to hold). More at hold.

Verb[edit]

halt ‎(third-person singular simple present halts, present participle halting, simple past and past participle halted)

  1. (intransitive) To stop marching.
  2. (intransitive) To stop either temporarily or permanently.
    • 1907, Robert W. Chambers, chapter I, The Younger Set:
      And it was while all were passionately intent upon the pleasing and snake-like progress of their uncle that a young girl in furs, ascending the stairs two at a time, peeped perfunctorily into the nursery as she passed the hallway—and halted amazed.
  3. (transitive) To bring to a stop.
  4. (transitive) To cause to discontinue.
    The contract negotiations halted operations for at least a week.
Translations[edit]

Noun[edit]

halt ‎(plural halts)

  1. A cessation, either temporary or permanent.
    The contract negotiations put a halt to operations.
    • Clarendon
      Without any halt they marched.
  2. A minor railway station (usually unstaffed) in the United Kingdom.
    The halt itself never achieved much importance, even with workers coming to and from the adjacent works.
Translations[edit]

Etymology 3[edit]

Old English healt (verb healtian), from Proto-Germanic *haltaz. Cognate with Danish halt, Swedish halt.

Adjective[edit]

halt ‎(comparative more halt, superlative most halt)

  1. (archaic) Lame, limping.
    • 1526, William Tyndale, trans. Bible, Mark IX:
      It is better for the to goo halt into lyfe, then with ij. fete to be cast into hell [...].
    • Bible, Luke xiv. 21
      Bring in hither the poor, and the maimed, and the halt, and the blind.

Verb[edit]

halt ‎(third-person singular simple present halts, present participle halting, simple past and past participle halted)

  1. To limp.
    • 1610, The Tempest, by Shakespeare, act 4 scene 1
      Do not smile at me that I boast her off,
      For thou shalt find she will outstrip all praise,
      And make it halt behind her.
  2. To waver.
  3. To falter.
Translations[edit]

Noun[edit]

halt ‎(plural halts)

  1. (dated) Lameness; a limp.

Anagrams[edit]


Alemannic German[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Middle High German halt.

Pronunciation[edit]

Adverb[edit]

halt

  1. just, simply
    • 1978, Rolf Lyssy & Christa Maerker, Die Schweizermacher, (transcript):
      Chömmer halt e chli früner. Schadet a nüt.
      Then we'll just arrive a little earlier. It won't do any harm.

Danish[edit]

Adjective[edit]

halt

  1. lame

German[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From the verb halten ‎(to hold; to stop).

Verb[edit]

halt

  1. Imperative singular of halten.

Interjection[edit]

halt!

  1. stop!, wait!

Etymology 2[edit]

From Middle High German halt, pertaining to Old High German halto ‎(soon, fast).

Adverb[edit]

halt

  1. (colloquial, modal particle) so, just, simply, indicating that something is generally known, or cannot be changed, or the like; often untranslatable
    Er ist halt ein Idiot...
    So he′s an idiot...
    Dann müssen wir halt härter arbeiten.
    Then we’ll just have to work harder.

Usage notes[edit]

  • The word is originally southern German and is still so considered by some contemporary dictionaries. It has, however, become generally accepted throughout the language area during the past decades.

See also[edit]


Hungarian[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

halt

  1. past participle of hal

Irish[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

halt m

  1. h-prothesized form of alt

Old French[edit]

Adjective[edit]

halt m ‎(feminine halte)

  1. high; elevated

Adverb[edit]

halt

  1. loud; loudly

Derived terms[edit]