hoit

Definition from Wiktionary, the free dictionary
Jump to navigation Jump to search

English[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

  • (UK) IPA(key): /ˈhɔɪt/
    • (file)

Etymology 1[edit]

Compare Welsh hoetian (to dally, dandle).

Verb[edit]

hoit

  1. (archaic) To play the fool; to behave thoughtlessly and frivolously.
    • 1650, Thomas Fuller, “Of the Clothes and Ornaments of the Jews”, in A Pisgah Sight of Palestine and the Confines thereof; with the History of the Old and New Testament Acted thereon. [], London: William Tegg, published 1869, OCLC 729957916, book IV, section IV (The Habits of Girls, Virgins, Brides, Wives, and Widows amongst the Jews), paragraph 2, page 535:
      Let none condemn them [girls] for rigs, because thus hoiting with boys, seeing the simplicity of their age was a patent to privilege any innocent pastime, and few more years will make them blush themselves into better manners.
  2. (obsolete) To leap; to caper; to romp noisily.

Derived terms[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

Verb[edit]

hoit (third-person singular simple present hoits, present participle hoiting, simple past and past participle hoit)

  1. Pronunciation spelling of hurt.

Anagrams[edit]


Finnish[edit]

Verb[edit]

hoit

  1. Second-person singular indicative past form of hokea.

Anagrams[edit]


Romanian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from Hungarian holt, from hal, from Proto-Uralic *kale- (to die).

Noun[edit]

hoit n (plural hoituri)

  1. carrion, carcass
  2. corpse

Declension[edit]

Synonyms[edit]