homo

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See also: HOMO, Homo, and homo-

English[edit]

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Etymology[edit]

A clipping of words formed from Ancient Greek ὁμο- ‎(homo-, same).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

homo ‎(countable and uncountable, plural homos)

  1. (colloquial, often pejorative) Short form of homosexual.
    • 1938, Cecil Day Lewis, Starting point[1], page 127:
      "... He's a homo."
      "My dear Theo, at my age one can't worry about little details like that. Besides, he's got such a nice voice."
    I heard that she's a homo, but she hasn't come out of the closet yet.
  2. (uncountable, dated, US, Canada) Homogenized milk with a high butterfat content.
    • 1956, Purdue University. Agricultural Experiment Station., Station bulletin[2], page 25:
      One quart of homo wholesale in glass equals one quart equivalent. Certain modifications were made in these relatives to adjust for variations in units per ...

Translations[edit]

Adjective[edit]

homo ‎(comparative more homo, superlative most homo)

  1. (colloquial, sometimes pejorative) Of or pertaining to homosexuality.
  2. (not comparable, Canada, US) Homogenized; almost always said of milk with a high butterfat content.
    • 1958, American milk review and milk plant monthly[3], volume 20, page 190:
      Regular homo milk was being sold out of stores in half gallons for 33 cents against 44 cents on regular homo milk on home delivery.

Anagrams[edit]


Chickasaw[edit]

Verb[edit]

homo

  1. to roof

Dutch[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

  • (file)
  • Hyphenation: ho‧mo

Etymology[edit]

From homoseksueel.

Noun[edit]

homo m ‎(plural homo's, diminutive homootje n)

  1. (neutral, not offensive) gay, homosexual
  2. (offensive, derogatory) Used as a general slur.

Usage notes[edit]

The word homo is a general, neutral and somewhat informal term for a homosexual person. It is used as a slur by some, but either the term, or its use in this way, this can be considered offensive. Because the word itself is not inherently offensive or vulgar, some people may take offense at the implication that homosexuality is something negative and shameful that could be used as a derogatory term. This depends, of course, on a particular person's attitude towards homosexuality. Compare similar usage of English gay.

Derived terms[edit]


Esperanto[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin homo. Compare Catalan home, French homme, Interlingua homine, Italian uomo, Portuguese homem, Romanian om, Sardinian ómine, Spanish hombre.

Noun[edit]

homo ‎(accusative singular homon, plural homoj, accusative plural homojn)

  1. a human being, person
    • 1933, La Sankta Biblio, (Evangelio laŭ Luko 4:4):
      Kaj Jesuo respondis al li: Estas skribite, Ne per la pano sole vivos homo.
      Then Jesus answered him, "It is written, "Man shall not live by bread alone." (Luke 4:4)

Synonyms[edit]

Hyponyms[edit]

Hypernyms[edit]

Holonyms[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

See also[edit]

homo


Finnish[edit]

Noun[edit]

homo

  1. gay man
  2. (rarely) any gay person
  3. (offensive, derogatory) Used as a general slur.

Usage notes[edit]

The word homo is a general, neutral and somewhat informal term for a homosexual person. It is used as a slur by some, but either the term, or its use in this way, this can be considered offensive. Because the word itself is not inherently offensive or vulgar, some people may take offense at the implication that homosexuality is something negative and shameful that could be used as a derogatory term. This depends, of course, on a particular person's attitude towards homosexuality. Compare similar usage in Dutch.

Declension[edit]

Inflection of homo (Kotus type 1/valo, no gradation)
nominative homo homot
genitive homon homojen
partitive homoa homoja
illative homoon homoihin
singular plural
nominative homo homot
accusative nom. homo homot
gen. homon
genitive homon homojen
partitive homoa homoja
inessive homossa homoissa
elative homosta homoista
illative homoon homoihin
adessive homolla homoilla
ablative homolta homoilta
allative homolle homoille
essive homona homoina
translative homoksi homoiksi
instructive homoin
abessive homotta homoitta
comitative homoineen

Synonyms[edit]

Derived terms[edit]


Franco-Provençal[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin homō, from Proto-Indo-European *dʰǵʰm̥mō ‎(earthling).

Pronunciation[edit]

  • (Savoyard dialect) IPA(key): /ˈomo/
  • (Bressan dialect) IPA(key): /ˈumu/

Noun[edit]

homo m ‎(plural homos)

  1. man

French[edit]

Noun[edit]

homo m, f ‎(plural homos)

  1. gay (homosexual person, especially male)

Adjective[edit]

homo m, f ‎(plural homos)

  1. gay, homo

External links[edit]


Ido[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Esperanto homo, from English human, French homme and humain, Italian uomo, Spanish hombre, from Latin homō, from Proto-Indo-European *dʰǵʰm̥mō ‎(earthling).

Noun[edit]

homo (plural homi)

  1. human, man

Derived terms[edit]

Antonyms[edit]


Italian[edit]

Noun[edit]

homo m ‎(plural homini)

  1. Obsolete spelling of omo
    • c. 13th century, Francis of Assisi, “Cantico di Frate Sole”, Biblioteca del Sacro Convento di San Francesco [4]:
      Laudato ſi mi ſignore ᵱ ſora noſtra moꝛte coꝛᵱale, da la quale nullu uiuēte po ſkappare.
      Be praised, my Lord, through our sister Bodily Death, from whose embrace no living person can escape.
    • 1472, Dante Alighieri, La divina commedia: Inferno, Johannes Numeister, Canto I, a3r, line 15]:
      Quando uiddi cuſtui nel gran diſerto ¶ Miſerere di me gridai ad lui ¶ qual che tu ſii o ombra o homo certo
      When I beheld him in the desert vast, ¶ «Have pity on me», unto him I cried, ¶ «whiche'er thou art, or shade or real man»

Latin[edit]

duo hominēs (two people)

Etymology[edit]

From earlier hemō, from Proto-Italic *hemō, from Proto-Indo-European *ǵʰmṓ ‎(earthling) (see here for cognate nouns), from *dʰéǵʰōm ‎(earth), whence Latin humus. See also nēmō ‎(no one), from *ne hemō.

Noteworthy is that the same Proto-Indo-European root gave both the nouns for earth and man similar to the development in Semitic languages: Hebrew אָדָם ‎(adám, man), אֲדָמָה ‎(adamá, soil).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

homō m ‎(genitive hominis); third declension

  1. a human being, a man (in the sense of human being), a person
    Homō hominī lupus est.
    Man acts like a wolf to man.
    Alere nōlunt hominem edācem.
    They won't keep a greedy man.
    Hominēs, dum docent, discunt.
    Men learn while they teach.
  2. sir
    Tū, homō, adigis mē ad insaniam.
    You, sir, are driving me insane.

Inflection[edit]

Third declension.

Case Singular Plural
nominative homō hominēs
genitive hominis hominum
dative hominī hominibus
accusative hominem hominēs
ablative homine hominibus
vocative homō hominēs

Derived terms[edit]

Descendants[edit]


Norwegian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Short for homofil ‎(homophile) or homofil person ‎(homophile person).

Adjective[edit]

homo

  1. homosexual

Inflection[edit]

Synonyms[edit]

Related terms[edit]

Noun[edit]

homo m

  1. A male homosexual person.

Inflection[edit]

Synonyms[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Related terms[edit]

References[edit]

  • “homo” in The Bokmål Dictionary / The Nynorsk Dictionary.
  • homo” in The Ordnett Dictionary

Novial[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin.

Noun[edit]

homo ‎(plural homos)

  1. man; man child

Hyponyms[edit]

Related terms[edit]


Portuguese[edit]

Adjective[edit]

homo ‎(plural homo, comparable)

  1. homosexual (involving or relating to homosexuals)

Synonyms[edit]


Swedish[edit]

Noun[edit]

homo c

  1. homosexual