illuc

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Latin[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Proto-Italic *e/olloike (locative), from ille +‎ -ce and thus a parallel formation to illōc (thither, to there), the latter from the instrumental. Compare hūc and hōc. See also illinc.

Pronunciation[edit]

Adverb[edit]

illūc (not comparable)

  1. thither, to that place, to there
Related terms[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

From earlier illoc(ce), for illud +‎ -ce, with vowel change extended either from the base form in which the reduction is regular, or from proclisis.

Alternative forms[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

  • (Classical) IPA(key): /ilˈluk/, [ɪlˈlʲʊk]
  • (Ecclesiastical) IPA(key): /ilˈluk/, [ilˈluk]
  • Note: as with hoc, the final /k/ of this word is doubled if a vowel follows, e.g. illuc est /ilˈluk.kest/.[1]

Pronoun[edit]

illuc

  1. nominative/accusative neuter singular of illic
    • c. 190 BCE – 185 BCE, Plautus, Amphitryon 270:
      Sed quid illuc est? Caelum aspectat. Observabo quam rem agat.
      But what is that? He's gazing at the sky. I'm going to watch what he does.

References[edit]

  1. ^ “Maurus Servius Honoratus, In Vergilii Georgicon Libros 10.668.1”, in latin.packhum.org[1], la, retrieved 2021-03-07

Further reading[edit]


Old French[edit]

Adverb[edit]

illuc

  1. Alternative form of iluec