impartial

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English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from Middle French impartial. See im- +‎ partial.

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

impartial (comparative more impartial, superlative most impartial)

  1. treating all parties, rivals, or disputants equally; not partial; not biased
    Synonyms: neutral, fair
    Antonyms: partial, biased, unfair
    • 1621 November 13 (Gregorian calendar), Robert Sanderson, “[Ad Populum.] The Fourth Sermon. In St. Pauls Church London. 4. Nov. 1621.”, in XXXIV Sermons. [], 5th edition, London: [] [A. Clark] for A. Seil, and are to be sold by G. Sawbridge, [], published 1671, OCLC 1227554849, paragraph 37, page 208:
      [W]e are to take a ſecond ſurvievv of our Abilities, to ſee if they be confidently fit for that vvhereto our inclination ſvvayeth us: and if upon due impartial examination vve find they are, vve may then follovv the ſvvay of our inclinations.

Derived terms[edit]

Translations[edit]

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout § Translations.

Anagrams[edit]


French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From im- +‎ partial.

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

impartial (feminine singular impartiale, masculine plural impartiaux, feminine plural impartiales)

  1. impartial

Derived terms[edit]

Further reading[edit]