implacable

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See also: implaçable

English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle English implacable, from Latin implācābilis, perhaps via Old French implacable.

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

implacable (comparative more implacable, superlative most implacable)

  1. Not able to be placated or appeased.
    • c. 1601–1602, William Shakespeare, “Twelfe Night, or VVhat You VVill”, in Mr. William Shakespeares Comedies, Histories, & Tragedies: Published According to the True Originall Copies (First Folio), London: Printed by Isaac Iaggard, and Ed[ward] Blount, published 1623, OCLC 606515358, [Act III, scene iv], page 269:
      He is knight dubb'd with vnhatche'd Rapier, and on carpet conſideration, but he is a diuell in priuate brall, soules and bodies hath he diuorc'd three, and his incenſement at this moment is ſo implacable, that ſatisfaction can be none, but by pangs of death and ſepulcher: Hob, nob, is his word: giu't or take't.
    • 1810, J[ohn] Stagg, “Arthur’s Cave. A Legendary Tale.”, in The Minstrel of the North: Or, Cumbrian Legends. [], London: Printed by Hamblin and Seyfang, [], for the author, and sold by J. Blacklock, [], OCLC 7000697, page 105:
      [I]n the reign of Henry the Second, a body happening, by chance, to be dug up near Glastonbury Abbey, without any symptoms of putrefaction or decay, the Welch, the descendants of the Ancient Britons, tenacious of the dignity and reputation of that illustrious hero [King Arthur], vainly supposed it could be no other than the body of their justly-boasted Pen-Dragon; and that he had been immured in that sepulchre by the spells of some powerful and implacable inchanter.
  2. Adamant; immovable.

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Catalan[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin implācābilis.

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

implacable (masculine and feminine plural implacables)

  1. implacable (not able to be placated or appeased)

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Further reading[edit]


French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin implācābilis.

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

implacable (plural implacables)

  1. implacable, harsh, unrelenting

Derived terms[edit]

Further reading[edit]


Spanish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin implācābilis.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /implaˈkable/, [ĩmplaˈkaβle]
  • Hyphenation: im‧pla‧ca‧ble

Adjective[edit]

implacable (plural implacables)

  1. implacable, harsh, unrelenting

Derived terms[edit]

Related terms[edit]

Further reading[edit]