incapable

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English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from Middle French incapable, in- +‎ capable

Pronunciation[edit]

  • (file)
  • IPA(key): /ɪnˈkeɪpəbl̩/, /ɪŋˈkeɪpəbl̩/
  • Hyphenation: in‧ca‧pable

Adjective[edit]

incapable (comparative more incapable, superlative most incapable)

  1. Not capable (of doing something); unable.
    A pint glass is incapable of holding more than a pint of liquid.
    I consider him incapable of dishonesty.
    • 1962 October, Brian Haresnape, “Focus on B.R. passenger stations”, in Modern Railways, page 254:
      The British people seem incapable of avoiding the habit of leaving litter wherever they go, and the railways certainly seem to receive their fair share of it, in carriages and on stations.
  2. Not in a state to receive; not receptive; not susceptible; not able to admit.
    incapable of pain, or pleasure; incapable of stain or injury

Synonyms[edit]

Antonyms[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Related terms[edit]

Translations[edit]

Noun[edit]

incapable (plural incapables)

  1. (dated) One who is morally or mentally weak or inefficient; an imbecile; a simpleton.

French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin incapabilis.

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

incapable (plural incapables)

  1. unable, incapable

Noun[edit]

incapable m (plural incapables, feminine incapable)

  1. incompetent (person)

Further reading[edit]