index

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See also: Index and índex

English[edit]

Wikipedia has an article on:

Wikipedia

Etymology[edit]

From Latin index ‎(a discoverer, informer, spy; of things, an indicator, the forefinger, a title, superscription), from indicō ‎(point out, show); see indicate.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

index ‎(plural indexes or indices)

  1. An alphabetical listing of items and their location.
    The index of a book lists words or expressions and the pages of the book upon which they are to be found.
  2. The index finger; the forefinger.
  3. A movable finger on a gauge, scale, etc.
  4. (printing) A symbol resembling a pointing hand, used to direct particular attention to a note or paragraph.
  5. That which points out; that which shows, indicates, manifests, or discloses.
    • Arbuthnot
      Tastes are the indexes of the different qualities of plants.
  6. A sign; an indication; a token.
    • Robert Louis Stevenson
      His son's empty guffaws [] struck him with pain as the indices of a weak mind.
  7. (linguistics) A type of noun where the meaning of the form changes with respect to the context. E.g., 'Today's newspaper' is an indexical form since its referent will differ depending on the context. See also icon and symbol.
  8. (economics) A single number calculated from an array of prices or of quantities.
  9. (sciences) A number representing a property or ratio, a coefficient.
  10. (mathematics) A raised suffix indicating a power.
  11. (computing, chiefly programming and databases) An integer or other key indicating the location of data e.g. within an array, vector, database table, associative array, or hash table.
  12. (computing, databases) A data structure that improves the performance of operations on a table.
  13. (obsolete) A prologue indicating what follows.
    • "Ay me, what act, that roars so loud and thunders in the index?" (Hamlet III.4)

Synonyms[edit]

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Translations[edit]

References[edit]

See also[edit]

Verb[edit]

index ‎(third-person singular simple present indexes, present participle indexing, simple past and past participle indexed)

  1. (transitive) To arrange an index for something, especially a long text.
  2. To inventory, to take stock.
  3. (linguistics, transitive) To be indexical for (some situation or state of affairs); to indicate.
    • 2008, Haruko Minegishi Cook, Socializing Identities Through Speech Style (page 22)
      For example, the feature I indexes the current speaker in the speech event and you, the current addressee.

Derived terms[edit]

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Anagrams[edit]


Czech[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

index m

  1. index (economics)

Related terms[edit]

External links[edit]

  • index in Příruční slovník jazyka českého, 1935–1957
  • index in Slovník spisovného jazyka českého, 1960–1971, 1989

Dutch[edit]

Dutch Wikipedia has an article on:

Wikipedia nl

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

index m ‎(plural indexen or indices, diminutive indexje n)

  1. index

Derived terms[edit]


French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin index ‎(pointer, indicator), from indicō ‎(point out, show).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

index m ‎(plural index)

  1. index
  2. forefinger
  3. The welcome page of a web site, typically index.html, index.htm or index.php

External links[edit]


Latin[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From indicō ‎(point out, indicate, show), from in ‎(in, at, on; into) + dicō ‎(indicate; dedicate; set apart).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

index m, f ‎(genitive indicis); third declension

  1. A pointer, indicator.
  2. The index finger, forefinger.
  3. A sign, indication, proof, mark, token, index.
  4. An informer, discoverer, director, talebearer, guide, witness, betrayer, spy.
  5. (of books) A title, superscription.
  6. (of books) An index, catalogue, table, list, summary, digest.
  7. (of paintings or statues) An inscription.

Declension[edit]

Third declension.

Case Singular Plural
nominative index indicēs
genitive indicis indicum
dative indicī indicibus
accusative indicem indicēs
ablative indice indicibus
vocative index indicēs

Synonyms[edit]

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Descendants[edit]

References[edit]

  • index in Charlton T. Lewis & Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • index in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • INDEX in Charles du Fresne du Cange’s Glossarium Mediæ et Infimæ Latinitatis (augmented edition, 1883–1887)
  • index in Félix Gaffiot (1934), Dictionnaire Illustré Latin-Français, Paris: Hachette.
  • Meissner, Carl; Auden, Henry William (1894) Latin Phrase-Book[1], London: Macmillan and Co.
    • the title of a book: index, inscriptio libri
  • index in Harry Thurston Peck, editor (1898) Harper's Dictionary of Classical Antiquities, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • index in William Smith, editor (1848) A Dictionary of Greek Biography and Mythology, London: John Murray
  • index in William Smith et al., editor (1890) A Dictionary of Greek and Roman Antiquities, London: William Wayte. G. E. Marindin

Swedish[edit]

Noun[edit]

index n

  1. an index

Declension[edit]

Inflection of index 
Singular Plural
Indefinite Definite Indefinite Definite
Nominative index indexet index indexen
Genitive index indexets index indexens