inebriate

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English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin inebriare, from ebrius (drunk).

Pronunciation[edit]

  • (noun, adjective) IPA(key): /ɪˈniːbɹiət/
    • (file)
  • (verb) IPA(key): /ɪˈniːbɹieɪt/

Noun[edit]

inebriate (plural inebriates)

  1. A person who is intoxicated, especially one who is habitually drunk.
    • 1889, Horatio Alger, Driven From Home, ch. 18:
      As he walked along, the inebriate, whose gait was at first unsteady, recovered his equilibrium and required less help.

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Translations[edit]

Verb[edit]

inebriate (third-person singular simple present inebriates, present participle inebriating, simple past and past participle inebriated)

  1. (transitive) To cause to be drunk; to intoxicate.
  2. (transitive, figuratively) To disorder the senses of; to exhilarate, elate or stupefy as if by spirituous drink.
    • 1841, Thomas Macaulay, Comic Dramatists of the Restoration (printed in Edinburgh Review, January 1841)
      the inebriating effect of popular applause
  3. (intransitive) To become drunk.
    • 1631, Francis [Bacon], “(please specify |century=I to X)”, in Sylua Syluarum: Or A Naturall Historie. In Ten Centuries. [], 3rd edition, London: [] VVilliam Rawley; [p]rinted by J[ohn] H[aviland] for William Lee [], OCLC 1044372886:
      fish that come from the Euxine Sea ; that when they come into the fresh water , do inebriate and turn up their bellies , so as you may take them with your hand

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Translations[edit]

Adjective[edit]

inebriate (comparative more inebriate, superlative most inebriate)

  1. intoxicated; drunk
    • 1894, Victorian Year-book - Volume 20, Part 2, page 355:
      Victoria, on the other hand, has apparently become more inebriate, as, according to the figures, arrests for drunkenness within her boundaries, in proportion to the population, increased from 12 per 1,000 in 1880 to 16½ in 1890 and nearly 16 in 1891; but even the latter proportions were still lower than in New South Wales during the same periods.
    • 1894, Norman Kerr, Inebriety; Or, Narcomania;, page 608:
      At 30 he was inebriate, with a drink period of twelve or fifteen days.
    • 2019, Onaly A. Kapasi, Tectonic Dyssynchrony:
      Karim found Sudhir disgusting when he was inebriate, as he was totally unpredictable and thoroughly inappropriate, albeit abusive and condescending; truly a rear-end of a donkey.

Synonyms[edit]


Italian[edit]

Verb[edit]

inebriate

  1. inflection of inebriare:
    1. second-person plural present indicative
    2. second-person plural imperative
  2. feminine plural of inebriato

Anagrams[edit]


Latin[edit]

Participle[edit]

inēbriāte

  1. vocative masculine singular of inēbriātus