inn

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English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle English in, inn, from Old English inn (a dwelling, house, chamber, lodging); akin to Icelandic inni (a dwelling place, home, abode), Faroese inni (home).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

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inn (plural inns)

  1. Any establishment where travellers can procure lodging, food, and drink.
  2. A tavern.
  3. One of the colleges (societies or buildings) in London, for students of the law barristers.
    the Inns of Court    the Inns of Chancery    Serjeants’ Inns
  4. (Britain, dated) The town residence of a nobleman or distinguished person.
    Leicester Inn
  5. (obsolete) A place of shelter; hence, dwelling; habitation; residence; abode.

Synonyms[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Translations[edit]

Verb[edit]

inn (third-person singular simple present inns, present participle inning, simple past and past participle inned)

  1. (obsolete, transitive) To house; to lodge.
  2. (obsolete, intransitive) To take lodging; to lodge.
    • 1714 March 16, Joseph Addison, “The Free-holder: No. 22. Friday, March 5. [1714.] [Julian calendar]”, in The Works of the Right Honourable Joseph Addison, Esq; [], volume IV, London: [] Jacob Tonson, [], published 1721, OCLC 1056445272:
      But where do you intend to inn to-night?

See also[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Cimbrian[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

  • in (preposition) (Luserna)

Etymology[edit]

From Middle High German in, from Old High German in, from Proto-Germanic *in. Cognate with German in, English in. The sense “east” may be reinforced by or a semantic loan from Venetian: vago dentro a Axiago (I go east to Asiago, literally I go inward to Asiago).

Preposition[edit]

inn

  1. (Sette Comuni, + dative) in

Derived terms[edit]

Adverb[edit]

inn

  1. (Sette Comuni, Luserna) inside
  2. (Sette Comuni) east
    Ich ghéa inn ka Sléeghe.
    I'm going east to Asiago.

References[edit]

  • “inn” in Martalar, Umberto Martello; Bellotto, Alfonso (1974) Dizionario della lingua Cimbra dei Sette Communi vicentini, 1st edition, Roana, Italy: Instituto di Cultura Cimbra A. Dal Pozzo

German[edit]

Preposition[edit]

inn

  1. Obsolete spelling of in

Gothic[edit]

Romanization[edit]

inn

  1. Romanization of 𐌹𐌽𐌽

Icelandic[edit]

Adverb[edit]

inn

  1. in, inside
    Hvenær komumst við inn?
    When can we get inside?

Derived terms[edit]


Mauritian Creole[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Contraction of finn, from French finir (finish).

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

inn (medial form inn)

  1. (auxiliary) Used to indicate present perfect tense or past tense.

Related terms[edit]


Middle English[edit]

Noun[edit]

inn

  1. Alternative form of in (inn)

Norwegian Bokmål[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Norse inn (in, into), from Proto-Germanic *inn (in, into), from *in (in, into), from Proto-Indo-European *h₁én (in).

Pronunciation[edit]

Adverb[edit]

inn

  1. inside, in (indicating movement into)
    La oss gå inn.Let's go inside.
  2. in, into
    Hun gikk inn i huset.She went into the house.

Derived terms[edit]

References[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Norwegian Nynorsk[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Norse inn.

Pronunciation[edit]

Adverb[edit]

inn

  1. inside, in (indicating movement into)
    Lat oss gå inn.Let's go inside.
  2. in, into
    Ho gjekk inn i huset.She went into the house.

Derived terms[edit]

References[edit]


Old English[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Proto-Germanic *inn.

Adverb[edit]

inn

  1. in (with allative direction)
Antonyms[edit]
Related terms[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

Probably from inne (in, inside).

Noun[edit]

inn n

  1. inn
Related terms[edit]

Old Norse[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Proto-Germanic *inn (in, into).

Adverb[edit]

inn (comparative innarr, superlative innstr)

  1. in, into

Related terms[edit]

Descendants[edit]

  • Norwegian Bokmål: inn

References[edit]

  • inn in Geir T. Zoëga (1910) A Concise Dictionary of Old Icelandic, Oxford: Clarendon Press

Etymology 2[edit]

From Proto-Germanic *jainaz (that over there, yon). Cognate with Old English ġeon, Old Frisian jen, jena, Old High German jēner, Gothic 𐌾𐌰𐌹𐌽𐍃 (jains).

Alternative forms[edit]

Article[edit]

inn (feminine in, neuter it)

  1. the (definite article)
Usage notes[edit]

The article is often used enclitically, at the end of the noun. This later developed into the definite forms of the noun.

Declension[edit]

References[edit]

  • inn in Geir T. Zoëga (1910) A Concise Dictionary of Old Icelandic, Oxford: Clarendon Press

Skolt Sami[edit]

Etymology[edit]

(This etymology is missing or incomplete. Please add to it, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.)

Noun[edit]

inn

  1. night

Inflection[edit]

Even â-stem, nˈn-nn gradation
Nominative inn
Genitive iinn
Singular Plural
Nominative inn iinn
Accusative iinn iinnid
Genitive iinn iinni
Illative iʹnne iinnid
Locative iinnâst iinnin
Comitative iinnin iinnivuiʹm
Abessive iinntää iinnitää
Essive innân
Partitive innâd
Possessive forms
Singular Dual Plural
1st person
2nd person
3rd person

Further reading[edit]

  • Koponen, Eino; Ruppel, Klaas; Aapala, Kirsti, editors (2002-2008) Álgu database: Etymological database of the Saami languages[1], Helsinki: Research Institute for the Languages of Finland