intense

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English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from Middle French intense, from Latin intensus (stretched tight), past participle of intendere (to stretch out), from in (in, upon, to) + tendere (to stretch).

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ɪnˈtɛns/
  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -ɛns

Adjective[edit]

intense (comparative intenser or more intense, superlative intensest or most intense)

  1. Strained; tightly drawn.
  2. Strict, very close or earnest.
    intense study;  intense thought
    • 1828, [Edward Bulwer-Lytton], chapter XX, in Pelham; or, The Adventures of a Gentleman. [], volume II, London: Henry Colburn, [], OCLC 729841413, page 196:
      I rose by candle-light, and consumed, in the intensest application, the hours which every other individual of our party wasted in enervating slumbers, from the hesternal dissipation or debauch.
    • 1886, Annie Besant, Life, Death, and Immortality, London: Freethought Publishing Company, [], OCLC 79181382, page 3:
      Of all the questions which, throughout the centuries, have escaped from the lips of man, there is none which has been asked with such persistence, none which has possessed interest more perennial, than "Whence do I come? Whither shall I go?" Man's origin, man's hereafter, have ever been of intensest interest to man.
  3. Extreme in degree; excessive.
  4. Extreme in size or strength.
    • 1818, Percy Bysshe Shelley, “(please specify the page)”, in The Revolt of Islam; [], London: [] [F]or C[harles] and J[ames] Ollier, []; by B. M‘Millan, [], OCLC 1142934411, (please specify the stanza number):
      And the bright air o’er every shape did weave / Intenser hues, so that the herbless stone, / The leafless bough among the leaves alone, / Had being clearer than its own could be []
    • 2013 June 29, “High and wet”, in The Economist, volume 407, number 8842, page 28:
      Floods in northern India, mostly in the small state of Uttarakhand, have wrought disaster on an enormous scale. The early, intense onset of the monsoon on June 14th swelled rivers, washing away roads, bridges, hotels and even whole villages.
  5. Stressful and tiring.
  6. Very severe.
  7. Very emotional or passionate.
    The artist was a small, intense man with piercing blue eyes.

Derived terms[edit]

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Translations[edit]

Further reading[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Dutch[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

intense

  1. Inflected form of intens

Anagrams[edit]


French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle French intense. Ultimately from Latin intensus.

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

intense (plural intenses)

  1. intense

Related terms[edit]

Further reading[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Interlingua[edit]

Adjective[edit]

intense (comparative plus intense, superlative le plus intense)

  1. intense

Related terms[edit]


Italian[edit]

Adjective[edit]

intense f pl

  1. feminine plural of intenso

Anagrams[edit]


Latin[edit]

Adjective[edit]

intēnse

  1. vocative masculine singular of intēnsus

Norwegian Bokmål[edit]

Adjective[edit]

intense

  1. inflection of intens:
    1. definite singular
    2. plural

Norwegian Nynorsk[edit]

Adjective[edit]

intense

  1. inflection of intens:
    1. definite singular
    2. plural