involute

Definition from Wiktionary, the free dictionary
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English[edit]

An image of an involute (sense 4) leaf from above and from the side
Diagram of the construction of two involutes (geometry sense) of a parabola

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from Latin involutus.

Adjective[edit]

English Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia

involute (comparative more involute, superlative most involute)

  1. (formal) Difficult to understand; complicated.
    • 1986, John le Carré, A Perfect Spy:
      These vulgar, pleasure-seeking people, so frank and clamorous, were too uninhibited for his shielded and involuted life.
  2. (botany) Having the edges rolled with the adaxial side outward.
    • 1992, Rudolf M[athias] Schuster, The Hepaticae and Anthocerotae of North America: East of the Hundredth Meridian, volume V, New York, N.Y.: Columbia University Press, →ISBN, page 7:
      Furthermore, the free anterior margin of the lobule is arched toward the lobe and is often involute []
  3. (biology, of shells) Having a complex pattern of coils in which younger whorls only partly surround older ones.
  4. (biology) Turned inward at the margin, like the exterior lip of the shells of species in genus Cypraea.
  5. (biology) Rolled inward spirally.

Verb[edit]

involute (third-person singular simple present involutes, present participle involuting, simple past and past participle involuted)

  1. To roll or curl inwards.

Noun[edit]

involute (plural involutes)

  1. (geometry) A curve that cuts all tangents of another curve at right angles; traced by a point on a string that unwinds from a curved object.

Translations[edit]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  • involute at OneLook Dictionary Search
  • involute in The Century Dictionary, The Century Co., New York, 1911.

Italian[edit]

Adjective[edit]

involute

  1. feminine plural of involuto

Latin[edit]

Participle[edit]

involūte

  1. vocative masculine singular of involūtus

References[edit]