jibe

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English[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

Origin uncertain; possibly from Old French giber (to engage in horseplay; to play roughly in sport). Compare English jib (usually of a horse: to stop and refuse to go forward),[1] Old Norse geipa (to talk nonsense).

The noun is derived from the verb.[2]

Noun[edit]

jibe (plural jibes)

  1. A facetious or insulting remark; a jeer, a taunt.
    He flung subtle jibes at her until she couldn’t bear to work with him any longer.
Translations[edit]

Verb[edit]

jibe (third-person singular simple present jibes, present participle jibing, simple past and past participle jibed)

  1. (transitive) To reproach with contemptuous words; to deride, to mock, to taunt.
    Synonym: flout
    • c. 1606–1607, William Shakespeare, “The Tragedie of Anthonie and Cleopatra”, in Mr. William Shakespeares Comedies, Histories, & Tragedies: Published According to the True Originall Copies (First Folio), London: Printed by Isaac Iaggard, and Ed[ward] Blount, published 1623, OCLC 606515358, [Act II, scene ii], page 346, column 1:
      [Y]ou / Did pocket vp my Letters: and with taunts / Did gibe my Miſive out of audience.
    • Jonathan Swift
      Draw the beasts as I describe them, / From their features, while I gibe them.
    • 1714, John Arbuthnot, A Farther Continuation of the History of the Crown-Inn, London: J. Moor, Part III, p. 15,[5]
      We could hardly speak before for fear of our Taskmasters; but we dare now Nose those Villains that used to gibe us.
  2. (transitive) To say in a mocking or taunting manner.
    • 1936, Margaret Mitchell, Gone with the Wind, Part One, Chapter 6,[6]
      “Eavesdroppers often hear highly instructive things,” jibed a memory.
    • 1953, James Hilton, Time and Time Again, Paris III,[7]
      ‘What’s the matter with you?’ the woman jibed. She called after him as he walked away: 'Nuts, that's what you are!’
  3. (intransitive) To make a mocking remark or remarks; to jeer.
    • c. 1595–1596, W. Shakespere [i.e., William Shakespeare], A Pleasant Conceited Comedie Called, Loues Labors Lost. [] (First Quarto), imprinted in London: By W[illiam] W[hite] for Cut[h]bert Burby, published 1598, OCLC 61366361, [Act V, scene ii]:
      Why thats the way to choake a gibing ſpirrit, / Whoſe influence is begot of that looſe grace, / Which ſhallow laughing hearers giue to fooles, []
    • Jonathan Swift
      Fleer and gibe, and laugh and flout.
    • 1722, Daniel Defoe, Moll Flanders, London: W. Chetwood & T. Edling, p. 7,[8]
      This set the old Gentlewoman a Laughing at me, as you may be sure it would: Well, Madam forsooth, says she, Gibing at me, you would be a Gentlewoman, and pray how will you come to be a Gentlewoman? what, will you do it by your Fingers Ends?
    • 1928, Radclyffe Hall, The Well of Loneliness, Book Two, Chapter 27,[9]
      But now her mother was speaking again: ‘And this—read this and tell me if you wrote it, or if that man’s lying.’ And Stephen must read her own misery jibing at her from those pages in Ralph Crossby’s stiff and clerical handwriting.
Derived terms[edit]
Translations[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

Origin unknown; perhaps related to chime (to cause to sound in harmony).[3]

Verb[edit]

jibe (third-person singular simple present jibes, present participle jibing, simple past and past participle jibed)

  1. (intransitive, Canada, US, informal) To accord or agree.
    That explanation doesn’t jibe with the facts.
    • Hearings Before the Select Committee on Investigation of the Tariff Commission. U.S. Government Printing Office, 1926
      There is something wrong with your figures. They do not jibe with experience. They do not jibe with prices. They do not jibe with what we know.
Usage notes[edit]

Jibe and jive have been used interchangeably in the US to indicate the concept “to accord or agree”. While one recent dictionary accepts this usage of jive, most sources consider it to be in error.

Alternative forms[edit]
Translations[edit]

Etymology 3[edit]

See gybe.

Noun[edit]

jibe (plural jibes)

  1. (nautical, now chiefly US) Alternative spelling of gybe

Verb[edit]

jibe (third-person singular simple present jibes, present participle jibing, simple past and past participle jibed)

  1. (nautical, now chiefly US) Alternative spelling of gybe

References[edit]

  1. ^ gibe, jibe, v.”, in OED Online Paid subscription required, Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1899; “jibe” (US) / “jibe” (UK) in Oxford Dictionaries, Oxford University Press.
  2. ^ gibe, jibe, n.1”, in OED Online Paid subscription required, Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1899.
  3. ^ jibe, v.”, in OED Online Paid subscription required, Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1901.