jour

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English[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

jour (plural jours)

  1. (chiefly US) Abbreviation of journeyman, e.g. jour printer.

French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old French jor, jorn, from Latin diurnum [tempus], from the neuter of the adjective diurnus (of the day), which is cognate with diēs (day). The sound change from Latin to French (‘diur’ to ‘jor’) is due to the [i] changing to a [j], followed by a merger of [dj] into [j]; compare French journal (journal).[1] Doublet of diurne, a borrowing.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ʒuʁ/
  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -uʁ

Noun[edit]

jour m (plural jours)

  1. day
    • 1837, Louis Viardot, L’Ingénieux Hidalgo Don Quichotte de la Manchefr.Wikisource, translation of El ingenioso hidalgo Don Quijote de la Mancha by Miguel de Cervantes Saavedra, Chapter III:
      L’aube du jour commençait à poindre quand don Quichotte sortit de l’hôtellerie, si content, si glorieux, si plein de ravissement de se voir armé chevalier, que sa joie en faisait tressaillir jusqu’aux sangles de son cheval.
      (please add an English translation of this quote)
      The dawn of the day was beginning to break when Don Quixote left the inn, so content, so glorious, so full of ravishment of seeing himself armed a knight, that his joy made him tremble all the way to the girths of his horse.
  2. daylight, light
  3. opening, aperture

Derived terms[edit]

Related terms[edit]

Descendants[edit]

  • Norwegian Bokmål: jour

References[edit]

  1. ^ Brachet, Auguste (1873) G. W. Kitchin, transl., An etymological dictionary of the French language, Oxford, page 206

Further reading[edit]


Norman[edit]

Norman Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia nrm

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old French jor, jorn, from Latin diurnum [tempus], from the neuter of the adjective diurnus (of the day).

Pronunciation[edit]

  • (file)

Noun[edit]

jour m (plural jours)

  1. (Jersey, Guernsey) day

Derived terms[edit]

Related terms[edit]


Norwegian Bokmål[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From French jour (day, daylight, light), from Old French jorn, jor (day), from Latin diurnum [tempus], from the neuter of the adjective diurnus (of the day, daily), a rhoticiztion of earlier *diusnus, from both diūs (old nominative of diēs), from Old Latin, from Proto-Italic *djous (day, sky; Jupiter) from Proto-Indo-European *dyḗws (sky, heaven; sky god), from earlier *dyéws, from *dyew- (to be bright; sky, heaven) + and from -nus (suffix forming adjectives), from Proto-Italic *-nos, from Proto-Indo-European *-nós (creates verbal adjectives from roots).

Pronunciation[edit]

Adverb[edit]

jour

  1. Only used in à jour (up to date, transparent)
  2. Only used in a jour (up to date, transparent)
  3. Only used in ha jour (to have a day of service; have a guard (or certain specific duties) on a certain day)

Derived terms[edit]

References[edit]


Occitan[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Noun[edit]

jour m (plural jours)

  1. (Mistralian) day

Swedish[edit]

Noun[edit]

jour c

  1. emergency duty, on call duty