judicature

Definition from Wiktionary, the free dictionary
Jump to navigation Jump to search

English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Anglo-Norman judicature, Middle French judicature, and their source, post-classical Latin iudicatura (12th century), from the participle stem of classical Latin iūdicāre (to judge).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

judicature (countable and uncountable, plural judicatures)

  1. The administration of justice by judges and courts; judicial process. [from 16th c.]
  2. The office or authority of a judge; jurisdiction. [from 16th c.]
  3. Judges collectively; a court or group of courts; the judiciary. [from 16th c.]
    • 1790, Edmund Burke, Reflections on the Revolution in France, Oxford 2009, p. 207:
      Such an independent judicature was ten time more necessary when a democracy became the absolute power of the country.

Synonyms[edit]

Translations[edit]

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout § Translations.

French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin judicatura.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

judicature f (plural judicatures)

  1. This term needs a translation to English. Please help out and add a translation, then remove the text {{rfdef}}.

Latin[edit]

Participle[edit]

jūdicātūre

  1. vocative masculine singular of jūdicātūrus