leet

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See also: le'et

English[edit]

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Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

Compare Old English hlēte, *hlīete(share, lot), cognate with Old Norse hleyti(share, portion).

Noun[edit]

leet ‎(plural leets)

  1. (Scotland) A portion or list, especially a list of candidates for an office.

Etymology 2[edit]

From Old English lēt, past tense of lǣtan(to let).

Verb[edit]

leet

  1. (obsolete) simple past tense of let

Etymology 3[edit]

Originated 1400–50 from late Middle English lete(meeting), from Anglo-Norman lete and Medieval Latin leta, possibly from Old English gelǣte(crossroads).

Noun[edit]

leet ‎(plural leets)

  1. (Britain, obsolete) A regular court in which the certain lords had jurisdiction over local disputes, or the physical area of this jurisdiction.

Etymology 4[edit]

EB1911 - Volume 01 - Page 001 - 1.svg This entry lacks etymological information. If you are familiar with the origin of this term, please add it to the page per etymology instructions. You can also discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.
Particularly: “Etymology uncertain”

Noun[edit]

leet ‎(plural leets)

  1. The European pollock.

Etymology 5[edit]

An aphetic form of elite, respelled according to leetspeak conventions.

Alternative forms[edit]

Noun[edit]

leet ‎(plural leets)

  1. (Internet slang) Abbreviation of leetspeak.

Adjective[edit]

leet ‎(comparative more leet, superlative most leet)

  1. Of or relating to leetspeak.
  2. (slang) Possessing outstanding skill in a field; expert, masterful.
  3. (slang) Having superior social rank over others; upper class, elite.
  4. (slang) Awesome, typically to describe a feat of skill; cool, sweet.

References[edit]

  • leet” in Dictionary.com Unabridged, v1.0.1, Lexico Publishing Group, 2006.
  • "leet" in the Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary, MICRA, 1996, 1998.

Anagrams[edit]


Luxembourgish[edit]

Verb[edit]

leet

  1. inflection of leeden:
    1. third-person singular present indicative
    2. second-person plural present indicative
    3. second-person singular and plural imperative

Verb[edit]

leet

  1. inflection of leeën:
    1. third-person singular present indicative
    2. second-person plural present indicative
    3. second-person plural imperative

Norwegian[edit]

Verb[edit]

leet

  1. Past tense and past participle of lee

Saterland Frisian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Frisian let, from Proto-Germanic *lataz. More at late.

Adjective[edit]

leet

  1. late

Related terms[edit]


Scots[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Compare Old English hlēte(share, lot).

Noun[edit]

leet ‎(plural leets)

  1. a list