legion

Definition from Wiktionary, the free dictionary
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See also: Legion, légion, and legión

English[edit]

Reenactment of a Roman legion.

Etymology[edit]

Attested (in Middle English, as legioun) around 1200, from Old French legion, from Latin legiō, legionem, from legō (to gather, collect); akin to legend, lecture.

Generalized sense of “a large number” is due to an allusive phrase in Mark 5:9, "my name is Legion: for we are many" (KJV).

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ˈliːdʒən/
  • Rhymes: -iːdʒən
  • (file)

Adjective[edit]

legion (not comparable)

  1. Numerous; vast; very great in number
    Synonyms: multitudinous, numerous
    Russia’s labor and capital resources are woefully inadequate to overcome the state’s needs and vulnerabilities, which are legion.
    dissatisfied customers and their legion complaints

Translations[edit]

Noun[edit]

legion (plural legions)

  1. (military, Ancient Rome) The major unit or division of the Roman army, usually comprising 3000 to 6000 infantry soldiers and 100 to 200 cavalry troops.
    Meronyms: cohort, maniple, century
  2. (military) A combined arms major military unit featuring cavalry, infantry, and artillery, including historical units such as the British Legion, and present-day units such as the Spanish Legion and the French Foreign Legion.
    Coordinate terms: combat team, regimental combat team, brigade combat team
  3. (military) A large military or semi-military unit trained for combat; any military force; an army, regiment; an armed, organized and assembled militia.
  4. (often Legion or the Legion) A national organization or association of former servicemen, such as the American Legion.
  5. A large number of people; a multitude.
    Synonyms: host, mass, multitude, sea, throng
  6. (often plural) A great number.
    • 1735, John Rogers (Canon of Wells.), “Sermon XV. Universal Obedience to the Laws of God, the indispensable Obligation of Christians”, in Nineteen Sermons on several occasions[1]:
      where one Sin has entered, Legions will force their Way through the fame Breach.
    • 2019 May 28, Zachary Karabell, “How Hidden Billions Are Making the Rich Richer”, in The New York Times[2], ISSN 0362-4331:
      Legions of lawyers make use of codes and loopholes like the EB-5 program in the United States, whereby anyone who invests $500,000 to $1 million can gain a visa; []
  7. (dated, taxonomy) A group of orders inferior to a class; in scientific classification, a term occasionally used to express an assemblage of objects intermediate between an order and a class.

Coordinate terms[edit]

Related terms[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Translations[edit]

Verb[edit]

legion (third-person singular simple present legions, present participle legioning, simple past and past participle legioned)

  1. (transitive) To form into legions.

Quotations[edit]

  • 1708, John Philips, Cyder, book II, London: J. Tonson, page 80:
    Now we exult, by mighty ANNA's Care / Secure at home, while She to foreign Realms / Sends forth her dreadful Legions, and restrains / The Rage of Kings
  • 1821, Lord Byron, “(please specify the title of the play)”, in Sardanapalus, a Tragedy; The Two Foscari, a Tragedy; Cain, a Mystery, London: John Murray, [], OCLC 317087118, Act IV, scene i:
    SAR. I fear it not; but I have felt—have seen— / A legion of the dead.

Further reading[edit]

References[edit]


Anagrams[edit]


Danish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Ultimately from Latin lēgiō.

Noun[edit]

legion c (singular definite legionen, plural indefinite legioner)

  1. legion

Declension[edit]


Esperanto[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): [leˈɡion]
  • Hyphenation: le‧gi‧on
  • Rhymes: -ion

Noun[edit]

legion

  1. accusative singular of legio

Middle French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

(This etymology is missing or incomplete. Please add to it, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.)

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

legion f (plural legions)

  1. (military) legion

Descendants[edit]

  • French: légion

Norwegian Bokmål[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Ultimately from Latin lēgiō.

Noun[edit]

legion m (definite singular legionen, indefinite plural legioner, definite plural legionene)

  1. legion

Further reading[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Norwegian Nynorsk[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Ultimately from Latin lēgiō.

Noun[edit]

legion m (definite singular legionen, indefinite plural legionar, definite plural legionane)

  1. legion

Further reading[edit]


Polish[edit]

Polish Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia pl

Pronunciation[edit]

(This etymology is missing or incomplete. Please add to it, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.)

Noun[edit]

legion m inan

  1. legion

Declension[edit]


Swedish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Ultimately from Latin lēgiō.

Noun[edit]

legion c

  1. legion

Declension[edit]

Declension of legion 
Singular Plural
Indefinite Definite Indefinite Definite
Nominative legion legionen legioner legionerna
Genitive legions legionens legioners legionernas

Anagrams[edit]