legion

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See also: Legion, légion, and legión

English[edit]

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Reenactment of a Roman legion.

Etymology[edit]

Attested (in Middle English, as legioun) around 1200, from Old French legion, from Latin legiō, legionem, from legō (to gather, collect); akin to legend, lecture.

Generalized sense of “a large number” is due to (inaccurate) translations of allusive phrase in Mark 5:9

And he answered, saying, My name is Legion: for we are many.

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

legion (not comparable)

  1. Numerous; vast; very great in number
    Russia’s labor and capital resources are woefully inadequate to overcome the state’s needs and vulnerabilities, which are legion.
    Synonyms: multitudinous, numerous

Translations[edit]

Noun[edit]

legion (plural legions)

  1. (military, Ancient Rome) The major unit or division of the Roman army, usually comprising 3000 to 6000 infantry soldiers and 100 to 200 cavalry troops.
  2. (military, obsolete) a combined arms major military unit featuring cavalry, infantry, and artillery
  3. (military) A large military or semimilitary unit trained for combat; any military force; an army, regiment; an armed, organized and assembled militia.
  4. (often Legion or the Legion) A national organization or association of former servicemen, such as the American Legion, founded in 1919.
  5. A large number of people; a multitude.
  6. (often plural) A great number.
    Where one sin has entered, legions will force their way through the same breach. — John Rogers (1679-1729) Google Books
  7. (dated, taxonomy) A group of orders inferior to a class; in scientific classification, a term occasionally used to express an assemblage of objects intermediate between an order and a class.

Synonyms[edit]

Meronyms[edit]

Coordinate terms[edit]

Related terms[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Translations[edit]

Verb[edit]

legion (third-person singular simple present legions, present participle legioning, simple past and past participle legioned)

  1. (transitive) To form into legions.

Quotations[edit]

  • 1611, Bible, King James Version
    Mark 5:9
    And he asked him, What is thy name? And he answered, saying, My name is Legion: for we are many.
    Matthew 26:53
    Thinkest thou that I cannot now pray to my Father, and he shall presently give me more than twelve legions of angels?
  • 1708, John Philips, Cyder, Book II, Google Books
    Now we exult, by mighty ANNA's Care / Secure at home, while She to foreign Realms / Sends forth her dreadful Legions, and restrains / The Rage of Kings
  • 1821, Lord Byron, Sardanapalus, Act IV Scene i, Google Books
    SAR. I fear it not; but I have felt—have seen— / A legion of the dead.

References[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Danish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Ultimately from Latin lēgiō.

Noun[edit]

legion c (singular definite legionen, plural indefinite legioner)

  1. legion

Declension[edit]


Esperanto[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /leˈɡion/
  • Hyphenation: le‧gi‧on
  • Rhymes: -ion

Noun[edit]

legion

  1. accusative singular of legio

Middle French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

EB1911 - Volume 01 - Page 001 - 1.svg This entry lacks etymological information. If you are familiar with the origin of this term, please add it to the page per etymology instructions. You can also discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.

Pronunciation[edit]

Phonetik.svg This entry needs pronunciation information. If you are familiar with the IPA then please add some!

Noun[edit]

legion f (plural legions)

  1. (military) legion

Descendants[edit]


Norwegian Bokmål[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Ultimately from Latin lēgiō.

Noun[edit]

legion m (definite singular legionen, indefinite plural legioner, definite plural legionene)

  1. legion

Further reading[edit]


Norwegian Nynorsk[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Ultimately from Latin lēgiō.

Noun[edit]

legion m (definite singular legionen, indefinite plural legionar, definite plural legionane)

  1. legion

Further reading[edit]


Polish[edit]

Polish Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia pl

Pronunciation[edit]

EB1911 - Volume 01 - Page 001 - 1.svg This entry lacks etymological information. If you are familiar with the origin of this term, please add it to the page per etymology instructions. You can also discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.

Noun[edit]

legion m inan

  1. legion

Declension[edit]


Swedish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Ultimately from Latin lēgiō.

Noun[edit]

legion c

  1. legion

Declension[edit]

Declension of legion 
Singular Plural
Indefinite Definite Indefinite Definite
Nominative legion legionen legioner legionerna
Genitive legions legionens legioners legionernas